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Full text of "Wellesley magazine"

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CONTENTS. 

r Florence McMahon Painter, '97 \ 

An Arcadian Festival ] Margaret Young Henry [ . 463 

( Mary Elizabeth Haskell, '97 ) 

Address of Welcome Mary Williams Dewson, '97 . . 474 

Class Song— 1900 Mary Geraldine Gordon, 1900 . 475 

Obation Alice Elizabeth Harding, 1900 . 475 

Presentation of Spade Mary B. Gilson, '99 477 

Reception of Spade Mary Geraldine Gordon, 1900 . 480 

Editorials 482 

Books Received 485 

Book Reviews 485 

Exchanges 487 

College Notes 489 

Tree Dat ' . . 491 

Float 494 

Commencement Week 495 

Commencement Day 500 

Society Notes 502 

Alumnae Notes 503 

Marriages 507 

Births 508 

Deaths 508 



dou id - -June, 1897- iro. 9 



Entered in the Post-Offlce at Wellesley, Mass., as second-class matter. 



"The added pleasure of riding a 
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of the $ 100 a Columbia costs/' 

The supremacy of Columbias is ad- 
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World. If you are able to pay H00 
for a bicycle, why buy any other? 



Full information about Columbias and the 
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Sbe finest flftf { { \ \\ CVyTat flftoberate Colt 

Young Ladies' Trimmed Hats j* <* # j* j* j* <* 

Exclusive styles of French, English, and American design and 
make, best materials, at prices ranging from $5.00 to $30.00. 

Young Ladies' Untrimmed Straw Hats & j* j* & j* 

All the newest shapes are invariably shown here first. Our 
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Second Floor— Take Elevator. 



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Europe tills Summer 

. . . CONSULT . . . 

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CHARLESTOWN, MASS. 




3fc Cloak "JKjfi 

3ti*udil ana dru^Uc 
oX mwLvraXk. c&vC 



YOUNG LADIES' SUITS A SPECIALTY. 

Discounts to Students and Teachers of 
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Dentists 

Dr. Charles H. Veo 

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SPECIALISTS IN 

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THE (JslLE. 



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FORTY MINUTES FROM 
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Prepares for all leading colleges. . . . Graduating and 
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Principal. 



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• • • FOR ■ • • 

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• ■ • ON ■ • • 

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Special attention given to 
Furnishing - Watches of fine Time- 
keeping qualities 



Late Head Watchmaker at Bigclow, Kennard & Co's. 
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BUY OF OSGOOD 



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BUSINESS MAP OF BOSTON. 




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6 Miss M. F. Fisk. 

7 Frost & Adams Co. 

8 De Wolfe, Fiske & Co. 

9 Shreve, Crump & Low Co. 
10 Boston & Albany Railroad 
n Isaac D.Allen. 

12 Winship Teachers' Agency 

13 Copeland & Day. 



14 A. Stowell & Co. 

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16 John H. Thurston. 

17 J- G. Small & Co. 

18 W. S. Butler* Co. 

19 Joel Goldthwait & Co. 

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21 Wads worth, Howland & Co 

23 Wright & Ditson. 

24 Springer Bros. 

25 Soule Photograph Co. 

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27 Gilchrist & Co 

28 A. E. Parsons. 

29 Fiske Teachers' Agency. 

30 T. Frank Bell. 
30 H. W. Downs Co. 
30 C. W. Hodgson & Co. 

30 N. C. Whitaker & Co. 

31 O. A. Jenkins & Co. 

32 George A. Plummer & Co. 
32 Wm. J. Dinsmore Co. 

34 Samuel Ward Company. 

35 John W. Sanborn. 

36 S. G. Stevens. 

37 Whitney & Co. 

38 Stickney & Smith. 

39 John C. Haynes & Co. 

40 Hotel Bellevue. 

41 Frank A. Andrews. 

42 Mile. Helene. 

43 J. D. McKennev. 

44 C. H.&L. N. Veo. 

44 Mrs. Dr. J. E. Bishop. 

45 Miss V. A. Mills. 

46 loseph Perkins. 

47 H. H.Tuttle. 
4S Boylston Piano Co. 

49 S. S. Pierce. 

50 T. D Cook & Co. 

51 Pinkham & Smith. 

52 Kiaelow & Jordan. 

53 Mile. Caroline. 



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GILCHRIST 5* COIXEF-AJNTY, 



5, 7, 9 and 11 Winter Street, Boston. 



w 



E solicit your patronage in all departments of our Dry Goods Establishment, promising 
you prompt and efficient service. 

Members of the Faculty and Students of Wellesley College 
■will, on presentation of certified cards, be allowed a dis- 
count of ten per cent on goods purchased. 



BELTS— ^ 



Shirt Waist Sets, 

All the Novelties of the Season. 
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3 Temple Place, Boston. 

A Tip... 

for Wellesley Girls 

Who like to be first in everything 1 . The best 
place in Boston for Ice Cream Sodas is at St. 
Clair's, corner Temple Place and Washington 
Street; and there are no better chocolates and 
caramels made than St. Clair's, which are 
served to customers fresh from the pan every 
business day in the year at the corner of Tem- 
ple Place and Washington Street. Other con- 
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old, and charge higher prices than they do at 
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Containing 

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Samuel Ward Company, 

49=51 Franklin Street, Boston. 
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DR. C. FRANK BEARD, 

SOUTH FRAMINGHAM, MASS. 



Operative Dentistry a Specialty. 
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EMERSON COLLEGE OE ORATORY. 



Largest School of Elocution and Oratory 
in America. 



FIVE HUNDRED STUDENTS. 



Has a thorough and systematic course of study, including' 
a complete system of Physical Training and Voice Culture, 
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*jf Address for Illustrated Catalogue, 



HENRY L. SOUTHWICK, Sec'y, 
Cor. Tremont and Berkeley Streets, Boston, Mass* 



The Wellesley Magazine. 



Vol. V. 



WELLESLEY, JUNE, 1897. 



No. 9. 



ASSOCIATE EDITOR. 
RACHEL S. HOGE, '9 



HELEN M. KELSEY, '95. 
MABEL R. EDDY, Sp. 
MARY O. MALONE, '98. 



EDITOR IN CHIEF. 
BETTY SCOTT, '98. 



LITERARY EDITORS. 



MANAGING EDITORS. 

ROBERTA H. MONTGOMERY, 
EDITH MAY, '97. 



BERNICE O. KELLY, '99. 
WINIFRED LOUGHRIDGE, '98. 
ELIZABETH A. MACMILLAN, '98. 



The Wellesley Magazine is published monthly, from October to June, by a board of editors 
chosen from the Student Body. 

All literary contributions may be sent to Miss Betty Scott, Wellesley College, Wellesley, Mass. 

All items of college interest, and communications to be inserted in the department of Free Press, 
will be received by Miss Rachel S. Hoge, Wellesley College, Wellesley, Mass. 

All alumnse news should be sent to Miss Helen M. Kelsey, Wellesley, Mass. 

Advertising business is conducted by Miss Edith May, Wellesley College, Wellesley, Mass. 

Subscriptions to the Magazine and other business communications should in all cases be sent to 
Miss Roberta II. Montgomery, Wellesley College, Wellesley, Mass. 

Terms, $1.75 per year; single copies, 25 cents. Payment should be made by money order. 



AN ARCADIAN FESTIVAL. 

PERSONS REPRESENTED. 

Phyllis Floyd Smith. 

Clokinda Margaret Y. Henry. 

Daphne Florence McM. Painter. 

Amaryllis Grace Ball. 

Melicerte Rebekah G. Blanchard. 

Arethusa Edith Dudley. 

Chloe Amy F. Boutelle. 

Phyllida Margaret E. Starr. 

Dorcas Louise Plutcheson. 

Phoj:be Agnes L. Bacon. 

The God Sylvanus Mary E. Haskell. 

Chorus of Shepherdesses. 



Shepherdesses. 



464 THE WELLESLEY MAGAZINE. 



(A dance of shepherdesses. At the end the dancers break ranks and fall into groups.) 

Phyllis: Our festival day again, ye shepherd maidens! How pleas- 
ant it is to dance ! But come, shall we celebrate the day, as we have since 
olden time, with speech and song? 

All: Yes ! yes ! our old woodland rites ! Draw the lot ! 

Phyllis: Come, then, Amaryllis, choose the lot with me. 

(Amaryllis goes about and takes in her hat different flowers from all the maidens; she brings it to Phyllis. Other 
shepherdesses gather toward them, or talk in groups.) 

Phyllis: Now will I draw. (Draws a laurel bud.) Daphne, it is thy 
flower. Thou wast well-nigh too late. for this duty. 
All: Daphne! Daphne! 

( Daphne hangs back. The others run tip and draw her forward.) 

Daphne: Me! alack! sweet friends; what shall I do to please ye! 
Will ye have a song? 

All: Nay, nay — 

Arethusa: We can sing ourselves. 

Daphne: Shall I play on the lute, that ye may dance your dance on 
the green ? 

All: Nay, nay — 

Amaryllis : We can dance without the lute. 

Daphne: What, then, will ye have? 

Phyllis: Let it even be a discourse, gentle Daphne: a discourse in 
good set terms, with many maxims, and an admirable moral concluding. 
Surely, it is ever the custom to lend dignity to a festivity. 

All: Aye! aye! a discourse. 

Daphne: What, then, shall I discourse upon? 

Amaryllis: Oh, upon us — 

Phyllis : And Arcadia — 

Phoebe: And the great world — 

Chloe: And us — 

Melicerte : And the purpose of life — 

Dorcas : And the value of learning — 

Phyllida : And us — 

Amaryllis : And other people — 



THE WELLE 'SLEY MAGAZLNE. 465 

Phyllis: But principally of us. 

Phoebe: And prithee, good Daphne, let it not be over long. 
Melicerte: Nor over-saddened with the thought of parting — 
Amaryllis: Aye, let it be merry, forsooth, with sayings taken from 
writers of a good wit. 

Chloe: And of a certainty do not forget the moral. 

( They crowd around, all speaking at once. Daphne turns from one to another dazed.) 

Daphne: Fair friends, ye mean me well, but ye confuse me sorely. I 
can but essay, and pray Pan I may please ye. In good set terms, then, — 

Fellow-women (sternly), ye on whose shoulders rests the burden of 
the higher education, ye whose personal responsibility it is to right all 
wrongs of society, beware lest ye for the moment forget your high calling. 
Your sacred duty it is to "let the deed shaw." Take heed, therefore, that 
that deed be ever calm, well considered, exemplary : neither too hot nor 
too cold, but of a respectable coolness. Let your high standard be that set 
by the wise man of old — " neither to laugh nor to weep, but to understand." 
Let your 

f The shepherdesses, ivho have grown first grave, and then more and more discontented during this address, here 

break out into murmurs of dissatisfaction.) 

Phyllis: Prithee, peace. Enough of such matter. We came not 
hither to be taught the way of life by one who knoweth no more thereof 
than we. 

Daphne: But ye would have morals and maxims ! and weighty matter ! 
and now ye will none of them ! 

Melicerte: None of that color. Moreover, we have heard all this be- 
fore, these many years, in festival discourses. 

Phyllis: Prithee, good Daphne, begin afresh, and in another vein. 

Daphne: I will so, and speak this time of that which I know better. 

Sweet comrades : The very brightness of this festal day, and gayety of 
your dances, bring with them a haunting pain. As the time draws near for 
leaving Arcadia, every pleasure has in it a deep sadness, a new meaning taken 
on from being the last of its kind for us. Little by little we see the sweet 
Arcadian life slip from us, and as it goes the pang grows sharper at every 

Melicerte (sobbing, as are all the others) : No more ! Alack ! we can bear 
no more of that ! 



466 THE WELLE SLEY MAGAZINE. 

Phyllis: Thou doest exceedingly ill, Daphne. Call you this cheering 
discourse for a festal day? See, the shepherd maidens are all weeping ! 

Daphne (in distress) : Alas ! forgive me, sweet friends ! Forgive me> 
good Amaryllis ; pardon, sweet Melicerte. Alack ! what have I done ! I did 
but discourse as others have discoursed on festal days. 

Amaryllis (resentfully) : Aye, didst thou in sooth. We have heard it 
all before these many years, and could well have spared it altogether. 

Daphne (with resolution) : Now have I done with your good set terms. 
They are a pain in the producing, and a weariness in the hearing, and I will 
none of them. I will even try once again, and tell you a little tale. 

All (with pleasure) : A tale ! 

Daphne : Then listen. Once upon a time there came to Arcadia a little 
maid all clothed in green and gold, with a wreath of daffodils on her head 
and a pine branch in her hand. She came with hope in her heart, for in a 
very old book she had read, "This country Arcadia, among all the provinces 
of Greece, hath ever been had in singular reputation, partly for the sweetness 
of the air and other natural benefits, but principally for the well-tempered 
mind of the people."* And the hope she had was more than fulfilled. For 
this Arcadia she found beautiful as Elysium, so that only to see its woods and 
waters might gladden a sad heart or sweeten a bitter. But most of all did 
she rejoice in the people she found, who were not only well-tempered in 
mind, as the old book had promised, but for the most part kindly in manners 
and gentle and true in heart. So that she was happy there, and busy with 
thoughts of the best that had been said and done in the world ; and life was 
good. 

Time passed, and at last the day drew near for her to leave Arcadia. 
And as it approached she viewed it often with sadness, for that countiy had 
grown very dear to her; and sometimes with fear, for she knew not the rest 
of Greece so well ; but finally, with courage and a good heart, for she knew 
that Arcadia, with all its sweetness, was to the other provinces no more than 
a little walled garden is to the plains, and mountains, and cities of the world 
and she knew that life lay for her in that wider, rougher country ; she knew,, 
too, that one thing at least she could bring to that new life, gained from the 
old, — that is, the will and power to work. 

(Pause.) 

* Sydney's "Arcadia." 



■■■ ■ 1 1 



THE WELLE8LEY MAGAZINE. 467 

Phyllis : Is that all ? 

Daphne : That is all. 

All: All? 

Daphne: Aye. 

Melicerie : But where is the plot structure ? 

Pliotibe : Or the character development? 

Chloe : Or the atmosphere ? 

Phyllis : Or the point? 

Arethusa : And we've heard it all before ! 

Amaryllis : Only a year since, the very same allegorical sort of 



Daphne (in a temper) : Of a truth, shepherd maidens, it seems I cannot 
please ye. Behold, yonder wandereth Clorinda in one of her poet-mad 
rhapsodies, between heaven and earth, as I guess. Her ye know well for the 
sweetest singer in Arcadia. She now wanteth your approval. Perchance 
she hath even now some silver verses to delight ye withal. Call her. (Exit, 
angrily.) 

Florence McMahon Painter, '97. 



ii. 

(Enter Clorinda at back, with scroll.) 

Shepherdesses (calling) : Clorinda, Clorinda ! 

(She does not hear.) 

Phyllis: She is dreaming. Go fetch the lovelorn Clorinda. She must 
give us a song. 

{Shepherdesses run after her, and finally attract her attention. She follows them, with a dazed look, to Phyllis.) 

Phyllis: Not here for our festival, Clorinda? 

Clorinda: Festival? Is this a festival day? I forgot. 

Phyllis (sternly) : Where hast thou been, foolish maiden, and where is 
thy crook ? 

Clorinda: I was wandering on the hillside, listening to the breezes in 
the long grass, and I heard the voice of a nymph singing among the trees. 
And I started to find her, but lost my way, and left my crook. But per- 
haps I only dreamed that I heard her. But I have lost her now. Ah, me ! 
Ah, me ! 



468 THE WELLE 'SLEY MAGAZINE. 

Phyllis: Clorinda, thou art poetic, and nearest sounds that others hear 
not. Hast thou been making verses of late ? 

Clorinda: Only a few halting rhymes on the Arcadian country. 

Shepherdesses (gathering round) : Read them to us, read them, Clo- 
rinda. 

Phyllis: Yes, contribute this to the festival, although thou didst 
forget it. 

Clorinda : So be it. But you must all take up my lay, and join in the 
chorus. 

(Shepherdesses seat themselves around.) 

Clorinda (recites) : 

'Tis a gentle, flowery land of meadows green, 

Sweet scented with the air of ever spring, 
Where oaks cast lightsome shadows in the sheen 

Of sunlit lawns ; and lowly murmuring 
Young breezes fly and ripple, all unseen, 

The still blue lake and set it glittering. 
Here lies the land of Arcady, the bright, — 
A blissful land, kissed by the sun's gold light. 

The hills of Arcady slope softly down, 

Green billows of a grassy ocean floor; 
Brown thatches rise on sunny hilltops' crown, 

And sheepcotes overflowed with prosperous store. 
But far beyond, the dark, still mountains frown, 

And towers white gleam by the blue seashore. 
Secure in quiet lies our shepherd land, 
Sweet haunt of nymph and careless shepherd band. 

In Arcady the panpipes play all day, 

Piping of air, and sun, and floating breeze. 
Right merrily we leave the flocks to stray, 

Meet in cool shade and take a dreamy ease; 
Then to rustic flute we sing a shepherd lay, 

And hymn to Pan an ode of lake or lea, — 
To Pan, who dwells in thickets green and dim, 
And makes the woodlands all grow glad with him. 



By the green lake-banks we have found thee, 
By the rippled, sounding shore ; 

Thine eyes flung a gladness around thee, 
Tbine head an ivy wreath wore. 



THE WELLESLEY MAGAZINE. 469 

Pan, lead us, for we follow, 

Where thou dost lead we follow. 

For the joy of thy face, 

For the love of thy grace, 

King Pan, we follow thee! 

But we took great Pan from his hiding, 

We shepherds, to sport with us ; 
In the notes of his pipe confiding, 
Made him king to rule over us. 

Pipe, Pan, where now we follow ; 
Where thy pipe sounds we follow; 
For thy faint, sweet notes, 
From the reed's clear throats, 
King Pan, we follow thee! 

In graver mood we search the deepest glade 

To behold the face of dryad nymph or faun, 
And ofttimes hear a rustle, see a shade 

That passes, — leaving us not sadly lorn, 
But in love with the dell for the mystery so laid 

On its life ; and we set out again at dawn. 
The sunlight and the wood we cheerily roam 
In blithe Arcadia, our chosen home. 
But other pastures far away there stand, 

For Arcady lies in the heart of Greece ; 
The herdsmen are a gay but wandering band, 

And panpipes sing not of unchanging peace. 
Young shepherds need arise with crook in hand, 

And journey far to win the whitest fleece, 
Then blow the flute-notes sadly, dolefully. 
Ah me! that all the world were Arcady! 

SONG. 

Softly, sadly, blow the reeds 

With tender notes and slow; 
Shepherd maids must soon away, 

Out of Arcady must go. 
Dance not, O Pan, nor sing; 
Let no gay flute-notes ring 

When out of Arcady we go ! 
Sadly play a ditty low ; 

They leave fair Arcady, 
Jonquil fields and shady banks, 

Sports and rustic jollity — 
Sing not, shepherds, cruelly, 
Slight not who grieve unhappily, 

When out of Arcady they go. 



470 THE WELLE SLEY MAGAZINE. 

Dear shepherds, cease these strange and dreary lays 

For pleasures past, though sweet in memory. 
Still blow the pipes, and loudly singing, raise 

The Arcadian strains of clinging melody, 
Praising our life of long, untiring days, 

And the deep, calm sleep that crowns festivity. 
This hope is ours, and be it gladly told, 
Arcadia ever shall we find and hold ! 

SHEPHERD CHOKUS. 

By the running streams of the woodland, 

By the twinkling leaves, 
By the soft air of the summer 

As the sether breathes, 
We rejoice with the earth in her living, 

We joy that we live, too. 

By the flocks that we feed on the hillside, 

With their fleecy coats, 
By the small, bright things of the meadows, 

And their humming notes, 
We sing loud for delight in the singing. 

We joy that we live, too. 

No darkness shall shadow the sunlight 

On the world that floats, 
No weakness shall deaden the life spring 

That thrills in our notes. 
In Arcadia we are abiding, 

And live beneath its sun! 

(The Shepherdesses t/.ll kneel to invoke Pan.) 
Come, Pan, on thee we call; 
In the woods thy footsteps fall. 
Oh, come, our songs to greet 
With laughter loud and sweet! 
King Pan, thy name we hail; 
mighty Pan, all hail ! 

Margaret Young Henry. 
hi. 

(A jolly old wood god, who has been tiptoeing around the kneeling shepherdesses, waiting his opportunity to 
surprise them, now rushes into the group, and seizing one of the girls, lifts her to her feet with the 
exclamation ): — 

Pan sends me ! 

Shepherdesses (at first frightened ; then, on recognizing their visitor, 
delighted) : Sylvanus ! Sylvanus ! 



THE WELLE SEE Y MAGAZINE. 471 

Sylvanus (suddenly remarking the Tree-day assembly) : But our 
guests; pay ye no heed to them? 

/Shepherdesses (surprised) : Guests? 

Sylvanus: What! ye do not even see them? Ah, poor mortals! I 
did forget your vision was but human. Yet mark! To the eye of a god 
even the most insignificant things may be present. For four whole years I 
have observed these little beings in their ant hill, and familiarity has even 
endeared them to me. See now (to one of the shepherdesses)! Here is a 
large one ! Can you not see her? Ah ! At last ! Mark the perfection of 
•each tiny feature ! And there are more, and more, and many others ! I 
love to sport with them in friendly fashion. 

Ninety-seven ! You are like the woodpecker,- '97, that rattleth and 
drummeth from tree to tree as if he would tell it all. And yet, alack! he 
knoweth not all of it ! 

By degrees, to be sure, you are learning. For instance, you are learn- 
ing Geology, — or at least you will be learning it the day before the exami- 
nation ; and you have already learned that the reproduction of the glacial 
period through the modest vehicle of a wagon full of sand and a lump of ice, 
is not placed behind the express office in order that you may make mud pies 
unobserved by the freshmen. This is learning enough, for you have some- 
thing better than learning, '97 : you have magnetism. Everything loves 
you, and you have not been allowed to miss the wisdom fate denied you. 
Long ago, the rains played appreciatively on your athletic field, though no 
one else could ; and when you abandoned this enterprise, the field itself 
went into deep weeds. This year the gods have granted you a senior vaca- 
tion — an opportunity unprecedented for extension of time on your final 
work ; the regular course in astronomy has been discontinued, so that the 
students interested in stars might observe vou more at their leisure ; maids 
have been secured to do the domestic work of which you proved incapable ; 
and in order that your Tree-day exercises might contain at least one new 
feature, the twentieth century has come three years early. When you were 
sophomores the Class of '94 immolated itself, to spare you the future morti- 
fication of having given the boathouse to the College; and now that you are 
seniors, fond '98 lifts from your shoulders the reproach of the "Legenda." 
Yes, '97, by the inconspicuousness of your own deeds you have indeed been 
the means of letting the deeds of others shaw wondrously ! 



472 THE WELLE SLEY MAGAZINE. 

Ninety-eight looks happy! Ninety-eight expects a new chapel. But 
alack ! '98. Has a year of forensics not yet taught } ? ou to demand evidence 
before you draw conclusions? Yet never mind! Your "Legenda" is 
finished, if your chapel isn't. But how your " Legenda" Board must chafe 
under academic harness, where work more than three months late is so rarely 
accepted ! For you are beyond the shackles of conventionalities, '98. 
There is a barbaric splendor in the profusion with which you furnish forth 
candidates for the senior presidency, — ten in one afternoon, — and a Titanic 
vigor in the way you dispose of the lot within an hour. It was big hearted, 
too, when your executive committee had forgotten to make programmes for 
the play you gave the freshmen, for you to get the senior president and her 
sophomore friends to write them for you at the last moment. Everybody 
was touched ! 

You did well, '98, to decide to drop the editorial department of the 
Magazine by degrees, instead of all at once. Your rate of reduction — one 
half the column at an issue — is somewhat abrupt, but the sooner dead the 
sooner starward ! 

And '99: dear me, children, how you have grown since last year! 
Why, I'd hardly have known you ! You seemed still young, because you 
did not see it was a '97 at your class social receiving with your president 
and honorary member. But, after all, you were hardly to be blamed for 
taking such an evident goose for one of your own class or the Faculty. 

Here is one of nature's secrets for you, '99. It is only on a cold day 
that you can keep water on the register without danger of heating. If the 
day is warm, water left on the register while you go to chapel will boil 
before you get back, — even though there be a crayfish in the water ; even 
though that crayfish be the pride of the Zoology department ; even though 
the pride of the Zoology department strive mightily. Ferns, on the other- 
hand, when placed on the open register, bake, instead of boiling. A more 
steadfast attention to these facts when they were demonstrated, '99, might 
have enabled you, in hygiene examination, at any rate, to compete success- 
fully with the freshmen. 

Your dismay at being asked to give reasons for your choice of electives 
appears to us hardly justifiable. As long as one is fresh a new sort of 
mental effort ought not to seem so formidable. 



THE WELLE SLEY MAGAZINE. 47& 

The little fortnightly paper you were denied leave to edit this year 
would doubtless have been highly entertaining to the editors, and you are 
to be commended for the cheerfulness with which you sacrificed your own 
desires to the comfort of the community at large. If congestions of the 
dust shafts with small dry articles were not so inconvenient, the council 
would have granted your request. 

Are you a 1900? And you? And you? And what are you? And 
you? And those? All 1900's? Why, I thought there were only three of 
you ! Doesn't your constitution say your president must be elected by a 
two-thirds majority? and didn't you elect her on a majority of one? Well, 
I suppose the confusion is only partly your fault. If you had been allowed 
to matriculate after the mid-years, like '99, such a majority might have been 
legal . 

We are indebted to you, 1900, for the circulating library. Or are we? 
You might look it up, to make sure. By the way, don't be overcautious 
about increasing the number of books. If the library outgrows the college 
storage room, perhaps some member of the Faculty who is going away will 
lend you a Boston bag. 

You have shown many good signs, 1900. Another good one to show 
during your dance rehearsals would have been, " Don't Look on the Grass. "■ 

On the whole, however, your decision that freshmen secrets were too 
big to be kept in any place smaller than the college at large, was admirable, 
and we appreciate the delicacy of the methods you used to circulate your 
secrets, — especially that ruse with the embroidery woman in New Jei'sey. 
Even the most punctilious conscience could not scruple to accept informa- 
tion about your flower and colors from such a source. The greenhouse man, 
too, is admirable. We should advise 1901 to employ him again next year. 
We had known your tree already, however, — for are you not the direct off- 
spring of '98 ? And what but an oak could be the fruit of a corn-flower? 

You did not transplant the tree in order that you might dance around 
it, after all, did you? You were right. There are many cheaper ways 
than that to kill it. 

Your colors puzzle us a little, we confess. They can't symbolize 
apoplexy, — credit notes weren't general enough for that, — but purples are 
hard to interpret ! 



474 THE WELLESLEY MAGAZINE. 

Your change of song was welcome, to be sure ; we had enjoyed singing 
the first one with you ; but it is only less embarrassing to us than to you to 
be continually reminded of Q. E. D. and C. O. D. 

The motto is entirely satisfactory. It shows your intention to uphold 
the good old tradition of choosing the sentiment most inappropriate to the 
class. 

Now, don't be in a hurry to go ! Remember, I haven't said a word to 
1901 yet. The " Legendas " won't be all gone before you have a chance 
at them ; and even if you haven't subscribed beforehand, you can get one 
for a very trifling premium. 

Nineteen Hundred and One ! Little drop of wisdom in a bucket of 
folly ! It must have been your president that 1900 was electing. Never 
grow any larger, 1901 ! An embryo is a thing of infinite promise, and no 
knowledge of your characteristics can ever be so blissful as our present 
ignorance. 

I have said, and the tiny folk have listened. You see, we are friends. 
Watch now, pigmies, and the Arcadians will dance for us. 

(Another dance of shepherdesses. J 

Mary Elizabeth Haskell, '97. 



ADDRESS OF WELCOME. 

Swift-passing time has brought '97 in her turn to stand before you on 
her senior Tree Day. From her vantage ground, the honored festival giv- 
ing clearer vision, she looks both into the past and into the future with new 
eyes. She realizes, perhaps for the first time, that her college life belongs 
now to the past, — a beautiful, dearly loved past. To-day she gives a last, 
lingering look, for to-morrow she will turn eagerly, purposefully forward to 
take her place in the busy work-a-day world. 

To our parting, then, sad and yet even joyous with the joy of untried 
strength, we bid you welcome, you. our benefactor, you our leader, you our 
guides, and you our elder and our younger sisters. To all, '97 extends a 
ijlad oreetina;. 

Mary Williams Dewson, '97. 



Chorus . 



Chorus. 



THE WELLESLEY MAGAZINE. 475 



CLASS SONG— 1900. 



To thee we bring onr oif'ring rare 

Of purple lilies fair, 
And, Alma Mater, unto thee we sing! 

We sing of oak and fleur-de-lis, 

Of strength that leads to victory ; 
Accept, we pray, the gifts of love we bring. 
Oh, Nineteen Hundred, lift thy voice in praise, 
And Wellesley's honor to the welkin raise! 
Oh, laud her glory throughout all thy days ! 

The strong old oak shall be our tree, 
Our flower, the purple fleur-de-lis ; 
"From strength, to strength," our watchword aye shall be. 



Oh, we would joyously unite 

Unto thy rainbow bright, 
Our lavender and royal purple rare ! 

We pledge to thee our love unfeigned, 

Our lives and all our triumphs gained, — 
To thee, our Wellesley, beautiful and fair. 
We sing, we sing in burst of melody, 
To speak our aim, our dearest hope, that we 
From strength to strength increase thro' loving thee ! 

Mary Gekaldine Gokdon, 1900. 



ORATION. 

Friends and Honored " Officers of Instruction and Government," the 
Class of 1900 is proud to be numbered in your ranks on this joyful and long- 
expected occasion. 

We are deeply gratified for the interest you have taken in us during 
the last few weeks. Your frequent and solicitous inquiries about our plans, 
future hopes, and aspirations have not fallen unheeded upon our ears. Why 
did you not go to '99? She would have been able to furnish you with all 
needed information, as her knowledge has been greatly increased lately 
through absent-minded freshmen and unsuspicious gardeners. 



476 THE WELLE SLEY MAGAZINE. 

But such reminiscences are sometimes painful. We had better talk of 
others. How good it is to stop and take breath again ! Ever since we came 
here last tall we have been toiling up the dizzy heights of that lofty region 
you call the "Raised Standard of Wellesley." There have been numerous 
pitfalls on the way, in the shape of unexpected quizzes and tutoring classes, 
but the encouraging voices of '99, just a little higher, cheerfully assuring us 
that "they used to have the very same thing," have spurred us on. How 
we looked up to '99 in those first days ! How far ahead of us she seemed ! 
But now that we are resting upon the broad platform of Matriculation Cards, 
we find that we can see way over her head ! Our aspirations are now from 
sophomore to senior, and even still further, going " From Strength to 
Strength," as our motto advises. 

To-day, however, we have stopped climbing, and all our older sisters 
are peering down curiously to see how 1900 is going to acquit herself. We 
have chosen to represent royalty as most consistent with our noble ideas. 
Our King and Queen stand for the high ideals of college life. Their large 
retinue represents the different types of college girls, from the sober, serious 
warriors, who earnestly strive to guard and protect their ideals, to the merry 
flower girls and the careless jesters, who spend their time in amusing them- 
selves and in giving pleasure to others. 

All our distinctions are symbolic of ro3 T alty. What tree can compare 
in kingliness and grandeur with our stately oak? Just notice in this as- 
sembly what an air of nobility our royal purple and lavender shed about 
them. Our fleur-de-lis is the acknowledged flower of the throne, ever since 
the kings of France adopted it. 

With such emblems, is it surprising that our aspirations soar to such 
extravagant heights? Could we rest content until we had climbed to the 
very top, the natural place for royalty? The way is appallingly slippery 
sometimes, but the "steadfast, starward" tendencies of '98 and '99 have 
done much to encourage us. Ninetj'-seven has left many well-worn, but 
safe footholds in her strong endeavors to " let the deed shaw." So, with 
your timely aid, we will gladly take up our journey again after this delightful 
pause, always persevering, " From Strength to Strength." 

Alice Elizabeth Harding, 1900. 



THE WELLESLEY MAGAZINE. 477 



PRESENTATION OF SPADE. 

It is with some degree of surprise, 1900, that we see you have changed 
your plans for Tree-day costumes since day before yesterday. On that day 
•we heard shouts of childish ecstasy, and on running to see what they meant 
we found you prancing about on the shores of Waban, practicing your dance 
in those beloved gymnasium suits of yours. Of course we thought it was a 
full-dress rehearsal, and a terrible fear possessed our hearts lest you, in your 
mad zeal for athletics, were going to sacrifice your personal appearance 
to-day. We are immeasurably relieved, therefore, to see that you have laid 
aside those somber garbs in order that you might look as charming as possi- 
ble. Yet the very fact that you deem your personal appearance of more 
value than your athletic reputation gives rise to another, though less formid- 
able fear. We have in the past year demonstrated to ourselves and our 
friends that beauty and gayety are not abiding qualities. 

We, too, were bright and joyous once, 1900, but see into what sad and 
thoughtful creatures we have been transformed ! We, too, were wont to 
dress in the gayest of colors, but now behold the ominous garments that 
burden our backs, already bowed low with care and responsibility ! And 
history repeats itself, 1900. Yet though our Alma Mater would doubtless 
rejoice to have always such a handsome coterie of students, still, we feel that 
the evolution which will shatter your beauty may be for your advantage in 
other ways. For "events are the outcome of character," and we realize, 
from certain events that have occurred in the history of your short lives, 
that your character needs to unfold just a little more. We hope, however, 
that this development will not be so slow as that of your sturdy tree prom- 
ises to be, as we should really like to see the results of our influence upon 
you. 

Sometimes, in fits of despondency, we wonder whether you are subject 
to influence, or whether our efforts for your improvement are all in vain. 
It is an undeniable fact that when you first entered this haven you were, 
in your own opinions, at least, sufficient unto yourselves. We therefore 
surmised that introspection was against your principles. Yet we passed this 
failing by in long-suffering silence, since it was redeemed by your satisfac- 



478 THE WELLESLEY MAGAZINE. 

tion with your surroundings. Your first impressions of Wellesley evinced 
a loyalty never before equaled. We were rejoiced to find that you were so 
charmed with the Faculty, whom you were pleased to call " lovely, though 
feeble," and we do hope, for your sakes, that, although you " do not know 
them all now," you may "soon have that pleasure." Perhaps it may all 
end in a mutual admiration society, 1900 ; who knows? Your relations with 
this august body were certainly most propitious at first, — until you showed 
your little weakness for taking advantage of your superiors. When they 
were so good as to excuse you from examinations in mathematics at the dire 
mid-year season (though most of you did deem it wiser to take them later), 
why, oh, why, 1900, did you then demand your cards for a whole year's 
work? " Patience is a virtue," and if you come to realize this, perhaps you 
will get those souvenirs yet. At any rate, let us hope that your mourning 
colors may not prove significant. 

Your wonderful intuition in the choice of a nursery for your tree as- 
tounded us, 1900. But don't you think it stayed there just a day or so too 
long? Don't you, honestly and truly, think it would have grown better if 
you had been willing to take Mr. Tailby's advice? You know, " Oak trees 
must be planted early, young ladies ! " Still, we should like to express our 
gratitude to you for having your secrets announced to us in such a womanly, 
straightforward fashion. It is so much nobler and more honorable to be out 
with things than to keep your friends in a state of smothered expectation, 
especially when your friends have been so kind and thoughtful of your wel- 
fare as we have. 

But frankness is not your only good quality, 1900. You are unsurpass- 
able in the line of self-denial. What other class has Wellesley ever seen 
that would refuse the luxuries of life — prune puddings, Washington pie, 
and dates — for the sake of her athletic reputation? Has Wellesley ever seen 
a freshman class so exceedingly, so painfully unselfish as to refuse the few 
modest flowers ottered it by unassuming sophomores on the occasion of its 
presidential election? Truly, 1900, }'ou are a veritable altruistic organiza- 
tion ! 

We do not dare to insinuate that this is the fruit of our influence upon 
you. Rather, let us modestly remark that we think the gods were gracious 
in dealing out to us a wee bit of this — your predominant characteristic. 



THE WELLE SLEY MAGAZINE. 479 

We, too, are interested in the welfare of others, and so when we unwittingly 
spoke of your being matriculated at some future date, we did not contem- 
plate " hazing" you, as some of you innocently supposed. On the contrary, 
we decided that we would preserve our accustomed dignity in all our deal- 
ings with such an unobtrusive, diffident class. Because of that resolve, and 
because it was thought that you needed a governing power sooner than any 
class before you had needed one, we allowed you to go on uninterrupted 
with your election, though some of you did rebuke us afterwards for " lack 
of spirit ! " And, as a result of this conquest over our desires, our noble 
instincts were our guides on that snowy afternoon when you deluded your- 
selves into thinking you had gained a great victory. Listen, 1900 : it would 
have been less of a struggle for us to have won the victory in that little farce 
of a snow fight, — less of a struggle, I say, than the struggle with our inner 
selves. " It would be selfish," we argued, "to deprive the little ones of 
so much sport." Furthermore, we believed with Demosthenes that "com- 
munities, like individuals, should ever strive to mould their futures by the 
noblest chapters of their past," interpreting the " noblest chapters " as mo- 
ments inspired by a high enthusiasm that disregarded vulgar expediency. 
So, 1900, we were but living up to that noble chapter of our past — the 
afternoon of your presidential election. Magnanimity, then, has been, is, 
and ever shall be, our policy in relation to you. 

Perhaps you wonder that we have not this afternoon, with sophomoric 
condescension, tendered you any advice. We felt that it would be pre- 
sumptuous for us, who still feel that we have something to learn, and that 
Ave have not yet attained perfection, — for us to venture advice to a class so 
learned, so sophisticated, so well versed in all matters pertaining to both 
law and politics. So, may we be pardoned if we now hand this spade with 
no accompanying exhortations or instructions to you, who once so modestly 
termed yourselves 

" Last in the Century, 
Best in the Century, 
1900, Wellesley!" 

Mary B. Gilson, '99. 



480 THE WELLE SLEY MAGAZINE. 



RECEPTION OF SPADE. 

Graciously, O '99, in the spirit in which it is given, we receive this 
spade. The honest, straightforward praise which you have just lavished 
upon us rejoices our hearts, and we admire you to-day more than ever. 
But we can scarcely realize that you are the blithe and care-free spirits who 
taught us, while we were still teachable, that life was not a grind, thougii 
work was, it seems, a flunk. To what sad estate you have fallen ! 

We came to-day to sport in high carnival before you, to dance upon the 
green, with songs and jests on our lips, — to show you, sister sophomores, 
that we had heeded your wise counsel. But what a melancholy little band 
you are ! Before these sad relics of mid-years the light words die upon our 
lips, the glad songs in our hearts shall be unsung, for we would comfort 
you, poor '99 ! 

You didn't guess what sort of class we were, did you, '99? That 
was known only to the Faculty. You were surprised when those "lovely" 
officers of Government and Instruction so early found us worthy of Matricu- 
lation Cards. Because we straightway elected our president, and because 
everything was done " decently and in order" (Robert's rules), though, to 
be sure, " in the 'midst of alarms," hushed and awestruck you stood in ex- 
cited little groups before Lecture Room L, — your breath quite taken away. 
No wonder we accuse you of lack of spirit ! 

O '99, if you but played basket ball a little oftener you wouldn't 
lose your breath so easily! But 'tis unkind even to mention that worthy 
sport ; for perhaps some of you are still blue over the little game in which 
1900 proved that her motto was not ill chosen, and in which '99 showed 
that she still stood stationary to her old athletic ideals ! 

But you never did go in much for athletics, and you know you never 
would train, '99. And what, in consequence, is the composition of your 
class? O '99, "sugar and spice and everything nice," is what you little 
girls are made of! 

How pretty and winsome your young faces were as 3'ou danced glee- 
fully around Art Building hill that snowy day last January ! Ah, '99 ! 
it is not passing strange that you should give that little episode only a hasty 
word or two. We will not be vainglorious, and flaunt our triumph in your 



THE WELLE 'SLEY MAGAZINE. 481 

sad faces to-day. No ; since you wish it, we will pass over that victorious 
chapter of our history in silence ; for, we doubt it not, you are still a little 
sore on that subject. 

As we look upon you to-day, sad relics of the mid-year exams., con- 
ditions, and non-credit notes, the thought comes to us that at least two of 
the defeats which you have suffered may be traced to the same cause. You 
might have been proudly victorious in the snow fight, '99, and to-day you 
might have been cards in Hygiene, Bible, and what not, if you had not been 
such little girls. For in both cases was not the "raised standard" just a 
little too high for you? 

But never mind, little sister, for we do not take the fatalistic view in 
regard to you. We are sure that if you, too, give up prune puddings and 
Washington pie, and exercise just a little oftener on the playground, like 
1900, you will grow "From Strength to Strength." 

Mary Geraldine Gordon, 1900. 



482 THE WELLESLEY MAGAZINE. 



EDITORIALS, 
i. 

The Class of '97 has for its gift to Wellesley started a fund, the interest 
of which is to be used in the defraying of the general expenses of the 
College. Such an action fills a long-felt want. As one of the ten-year-back 
alumnae said, " No one but the children of Wellesley would think of giving 
.money to pay for the butchers', bakers', and candlestick makers' bills." 
That is it. The College is hampered at these very points, and whereas, with 
passing time, bequests and donations for, this or that particular object are 
coming slowly in, no outsider would sink his gift in a fund for these com- 
monplace but necessary expenses. We, loving our Alma Mater with a 
daughter's love, delight to put our mites to such a purpose. . 

The treasurer of '97 is authorized to receive the money, from a dime or 
a quarter to the larger sums, at any time ; but each year, just before Com- 
mencement Week, announcements will be sent to the members of the class 
that a special opportunity for giving has come, and that some one to be at 
Wellesley during this time of return, when the heart responds afresh with 
loyalty, will receive tokens which show its reality. The Alumnte Associa- 
tion has authorized its treasurer in like manner to receive what the alumnae 
can spare for this purpose. May the future classes, in their turn, join with 
'97 in their effort to strengthen the College at the expense of their own 
identity. 

ii. 

Our ever sympathetic and benevolent friends the Trustees, have done 
much for their "flighty highnesses," the Barn Swallows, during the past 
year. Future generations of college girls will say with wonder, " Can that 
stylish structure really have ever been a barn?" We have a hard- wood floor, 
which it is a joy to dance on ; a new drop curtain, which is distinctly appro- 
priate to the dramatic efforts of the club as smacking strongly of classic 
times. The unseemly rafters have been hidden from view, and the pillars 
which support the roof have been blocked in so as to present an artistic and 
graceful, if simple, appearance. Encouraged by these efforts in their behalf, 



THE WELLE S^LEY MAGAZINE. 483 

and by the promise of the much-desired heat to come in the fall, the Swal- 
lows decided to contribute their share. So electricity w:is borrowed from 
the Natick plant, and the Barn is now fairly radiant with brilliance o' nights. 
Judging from the dancing and gayety that has been going on since then in 
the Barn, we may safely say that the improvements were needed and are 
appreciated. 

in. 

Just a year ago this June the Barn Swallows started in life as a club, by 
the adoption of a constitution and the election of some five officers. Mnety- 
six did its best to push things through, and a noble list of two hundred 
members was enrolled upon the records. To these more or less enthusiastic 
charter members were added two hundred more in October, and now the 
club has over five hundred. Its avowed object was to promote good feeling 
and fellowship among the members and in the College at large, and to 
furnish the "student body" a fortnightly means of jollification with as little 
trouble and expense as possible. Underneath these stated motives lay a 
strong wish to further the real good of the College by increasing the spirit 
of unity, — to use a rather distasteful abstraction, — a desire to help the fresh- 
men in the new strangeness of things, and a sincere hope that the new club 
would tend to break down the unmentionable, invisible barrier that is some- 
times felt between society and non-society girls. As to the jollification, we 
feel an unquestionable thrill of pride when we think over the rare produc- 
tions which have been given since last October. Certainly there is much 
latent genius and originality in the College. To the owners thereof we are 
deeply indebted for their obliging natures, and their willingness to interpret 
the college motto literally and serve on committees. First, there was the 
initial meeting, when we, so to speak, broke a bottle over the prow of the 
new scheme afloat, and launched the Barn Swallows on its historic voyage. 
Then came two political meetings, when stump speeches and transparencies 
were the order of the nisrht, and much feeling and devotion to the cause 
were shown. Then, in the sincere conviction, as the "Legenda" appro- 
priately remarks, that owing to their efforts the election was safe, the 
Swallows laid aside the weighty political problems of the day and plunged 
into fast and furious dissipation by going on the stage. Conundrum : "When 



484 THE WELLE SLEY MAGAZINE. 

is a Swallow not a swallow? Why, when it is a star. At the final meeting- 
the club dispensed with stellar reputation and gave a lively, merry dance. 
Such, in brief, are the records of the year. 

How far we have been successful in attaining our object, outside of 
mere entertainment, it is almost impossible to tell. Everyone has a dilferent 
opinion on the subject. We, however, take an optimistic view of the 
matter. What the Barn Swallows has been to us personally is not a thing 
that can be expressed with pen and ink, and we are quite sure that many 
others are equally enthusiastic. This is especially the case with everyone 
who has had a share in the work, not to mention all the girls who have given 
hearty appreciation and interest at the various meetings. Of the w r orkers, 
though, I think there is not one who did not enjoy the fun behind the scenes 
and the excitement of being in it all. To be put on a work committee may 
be a hardship, but to have a part in the dramatic production most certainly 
is not. About the good feeling and comradeship that is felt among the 
Swallows generally, it is, of course, very hard to say anything which may not 
be attacked as "bare assertion." We are not here to read a sermon, but we 
would like to make one small suggestion very humbly to every member. 
Don't flock by yourself. You are hurting the club as much as yourself. 
To another kind of girl we say with emphasis : Look out for somebody else. 
The ability to "mix " well is not given to everyone ; it is a talent born in a 
select few ; but sociability may, at least, be cultivated. 

IV. 

This year has been an exceptional one in many respects. It has seen 
many innovations and experiments, not the least of which is the " Legenda" 
for this year. Previous "Legendas " have been the work of the senior class ; 
but as '97 decided to forego the honor and the work of getting out this cata- 
logue of the year, the juniors took up the task, and published a "'98 Le- 
genda." Owing to the delay which resulted from the change, the editorial 
board was not elected until just before the Christmas vacation. Six months 
proved ample time to prepare a notable volume, — but the " Legenda " speaks 
for itself. We are glad to say that the Class of '99 has followed the exam- 
ple of '98, and has already elected a board of editors to publish a " Legenda " 
their junior year. Success attend them ! 



THE WELLESLEY MAGAZINE. 485 



BOOKS RECEIVED. 

On a Western Campus: Stories and Sketches of Undergraduate Life, by 
the Class of Ninety-eight, Iowa College, Grinnell, Iowa. Illustrated by 
Frank Wing. Charles Wells MoultonrBuffalo, N. Y., 1897. 

Catalogue of German, French, Spanish, and Italian Books. D. C. 
Heath & Co., May, 1897. 

M. Tulli Oiceronis Cato Maior de Senectute, with notes, by Charles 
E. Bennett, Professor of Latin in Cornell University. The Student's Series 
of Latin Classics. Leach, Shewell & Sanborn. Price, 60 cents. 

Catalogue and Announcements. Ginn & Co., 1897. 

Labiche and Martin's La Poudre anx Yeux. Wells. Heath's Modern 
Language Series. D. C. Heath & Co., 1897. 

American War Ballads and Eyries: A Collection of the Songs and 
• Ballads of the Colonial Wars, the Revolution, the War of 1812-15, the War 
with Mexico, and the Civil War, edited by George Cary Eggleston. Illus- 
trated. G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1897. 

Flowers of Field, Hill, and Swamp, by Caroline A. Creevey, author 
of " Recreations in Botany." Illustrated by Benjamin Lander. Harper & 
Brothers, Publishers, 1897. 

BOOK REVIEWS. 

On a Western Campus: Stories and Sketches of Undergraduate Life, 
by the Class of 'Ninety-eight, Iowa College, Grinnell, Iowa. Illustrated by 
Frank Wing. Charles Wells Moulton, New York, 1897. 

As its title suggests, "On a Western Campus" purports to give the 
reader some idea of college life in the West. The book is a collection of 
short stories, published in lieu of the usual junior annual production in Iowa 
College. The incidents and scenes are incidents and scenes taken from 
student experience. Many of them are interesting, from a living point of 
view, as stories of a new atmosphere, and from a literary point of view, in 
comparison with the Eastern College sketches. 

In general the material resembles the usual material for college stories. 
Student life, in the main, is the same the world over, plot and prank differ- 
ing only as their individual concocters differ. A slight change in atmos- 



486 THE WELLE SLEY MAGAZLNE. 

phere, and the incidents of the book might have occurred as well in the 
East as in the West. As to the style, however, few of the stories can be 
ranked opposite "Harvard Stories" or "Princeton Stories." They lack a 
certain dramatic movement and final halt that is demanded nowadays in the 
short story. "For the Scarlet and Black" shows, possibly, the best dra- 
matic sense. 

On the whole, however, the little book is interesting. "Back in the 
Sixties," and " The Work of the Storm," are sketches that could have been 
written of no other locality than Iowa, and for that consideration are at- 
tractive ; while many of the others are written in a way to hold the atten- 
tion very pleasantly for a few hours. As an undergaduate production it 
deserves credit, and for its co-working authors it merits encouragement. 

American War Ballads and Lyrics : A Collection of the Songs and Bal- 
lads of the Colonial Wars, the Revolution, the War of 1812-15, the War with 
Mexico, and the Civil War, edited by George Gary Eggleston. Two volumes 
in one. Illustrated. G. P. Putnam's Sons, New York and London, 1897. 

The War Ballad collection, just out through the Putnam's Sons Publish- 
ing House, is a book of both literary and historical interest. The book is 
not issued as a complete collection, but only as an illustrative one. It con- 
tains all the most popular and significant ballads and lyrics of each of our 
struggle periods. Students of American events or of the effect of strife on 
literature may well receive the little volume as a needed and helpful, refer- 
ence text. 

Flowers of Field, Hill, and Swamp, by Caroline A. Creeve}^. Illus- 
trated by Benjamin Lander. Harper & Brothers, Publishers, New York, 
1897. 

To those who know Mrs. Dana's book on flowers, and Miss Creevey's 
"Recreations in Botany," the announcement of a new book on the same 
subject by the latter author will be heartily received. In "Flowers of 
Field, Hill, and Swamp," a grouping according to soil is followed. Flowers 
are described under their common names, making it very easy for those un- 
familiar with the customary botanical key to classify specimens. A short, 
significant description is given of each flower, together with its scientific 
name. A glossary of botanical terms and an index of botanical and common 
names, further assist the student to distinguish and assign to their proper 



THE WELLE SLEY MAGAZINE. 487 

places unfamiliar flowers. On the whole the book is one all would do well 
to own. To the "unknowing, but would-be-acquainted," it will be of in- 
valuable assistance, and in the modest words of the author, " even to those 
who are accustomed to botanical study, it is hoped that old truths in new 
dress may not be unwelcome." The book is also profusely illustrated with 

very successful sketches of flowers by Mr. Benjamin Lander. 

i 

EXCHANGES. 

The Brown Magazine for May has a thoughtful article on " Formative 
Influences in Student Life at the University of Chicago " ; also an interpre- 
tative study of Romola. The story called "The Coming Man" has a point to 
it, although it is a little awkwardly worked out. 

The Inlander contains an interesting paper on "The First Missionary 
to America," and a touching little sketch, " La Belle Mariette." 

The fiction number of The Red and Blue is rather disappointing. The 
only really interesting story is one written in the detective style, called "An 
Artistic Crime." The young archaeologist displays a good deal of that sort 
of imagination which delights in the supernatural, but the writer has not yet 
attained the skill which Robert W. Chambers possesses, to make the unreal 
unite happily with the real. 

The /Smith Monthly contains a study of insanity called " The Hand," 
which shows a good deal of morbid power. We should, however, like to 
protest against this sort of writing. It is doubtful if such literary food is 
good for any reader, and assuredly the dwelling on such horrible themes 
must prove exceedingly injurious to the imagination of any young person 
who attempts to write in so unhealthy a vein. A pretty little reminiscence 
of childhood, written in quite another and a far more charming style, is 
" My friend the King." 

A June copy of The American Queen comes to us from Gilchrist & Co., 
Boston. It contains an interesting article on "Champion Sportswomen." 
There are also illustrations and sujwestions for the most charming out-of-door 
costumes. The paper is full of useful and practical hints on matters of 
health and cases of emergency. It should be welcome in any home. 

The Wesley an Lit. contains a sympathetic paper on "The Trilogy of 
Sienkiewicz," and has also some of the best verse of the month. 



488 THE WELLESLEY MAGAZINE. 

The Columbia Lit. has an appreciative study of Victor Hugo as a lyric 
poet. A short sketch of studio life, which strikes an old truth strongly, is- 
called, " The Best Possible Ending." The most daring and original experi- 
ment in verse which we have seen lately is a short dramatic poem entitled, 
" The Bringing of the Dust." 

In The White and Gold we note an excellent article on "Childhood in 
George Eliot's Novels," also a pleasing sketch called " The Ladye of the Old 
Ballade," which is prettily illustrated in pen and ink. 

The Kalends has two interesting articles ; one on a noted French critic, 
M. Ferdinand Brunetiere, — the other on a noted French woman, Madame 
Blanc-Bentzon. 

The Western Oxford for May is a bright number, with an especially 
good article on " The Doctrine of Influence." 

The June number of The Bryn Maicr Lantern is an issue of which the 
college may well be proud. Its excellence may best be described in the 
words of its own editorial: "Already noticeable on more than one of the 
pages is that trait most characteristic and most admirable in the Lantern, — 
a sureness of touch, a steadiness and certainty of hand, which again and 
again has, by an essa} r , a story, a poem, lifted it for a moment out of the 
amateur and into the professional class." 

We note especially an article on the author of "Charles Auchester" 
and one on Rudyard Kipling, also an interesting descriptive sketch, " Street 
Scenes in Athens." We clip the following from the Wesleyan Lit. : — 

WASTED: A BOOK OF TRAVELS. 

O who shall write the voyages down 
Where dragon-flies set sail and drown? 
Who knows the rigging of the craft 
Where fare the fat moths, drunk and daft? 
O come, historian of the sky ! 
Name us the navies of the fly, 
And trace the pathways up the blue 
Where prayers arise, where Ariel flew, 
Which Shelley's sun-wooed skylark knew. 
Show us the lace-like canvas thin 
Which bears the dreams of Might Have Been; 
Fathom the leagues of ether-sea, 
And write the Odyssey of a bee! 



THE WELLESLEY MAGAZINE. 489 



ONE WANING MOON. 

Like a withered petal blown 'on high 

From a shattered rose of June, 
Across a gusty, cloud-sown sky, 

Drifted the shrunken moon. 

It fell on waves that yelled for prey, 

It lit the wings of a gull ; 
It shone on a rusting anchor that lay 

On the deck of a drifting hull. 

It glimmered on drunken alleys and lanes, 

On hideous chimneys steep ; 
It streamed through the little farmhouse panes 

On lips that smiled in sleep. 



COLLEGE NOTES. 

April 26. — Society Zeta Alpha gives a colonial ball in the Gymnasium. 

May 1. — Ninety-seven observed the usual custom of rolling hoops 
around the "circle"; 3.00 p. m., Wellesley victorious in a basket-hull game 
between the College and the Girls' High School, of Newton; 7.30 P. M., 
concert by the Boston Festival Orchestra, Mr. Emil Mollenhaur, director. 

May 2. — Dean George Hodges, of Cambridge, preaches in the chapel. 

May 6. — Election of '98 president for the senior year, resulting in the 
election of Miss Edna V. Patterson. 

May 8. — 4.15 p. m., Professor Harms, of Harvard, head of the depart- 
ment of History and the Art of Teaching, lectured to the students intending 
to teach on " Some Problems of Modern Secondary Schools." 

May 9. — Preaching by Dr. O. C. Curtis, of Madison, N. J. 

May 10. — 3.00 p. m., Miss Morgan gives a "Bell-Cycle" party to her 
friends in the Art Building. At the same hour the Zoology Club receive 
their friends in the gymnasium; 7.30, Pres. Stanley Hall lectures on "The 
New Psychology of Common Sense." 

May 11. — The annual election of the " Barn Swallows" resulted in the 
choice of the following officers for next year: president, M. O. Malone, '98 ; 
vice president, C. F. Woodbury, '99; secretary, F. Brentano, 1900: treas- 
urer, M. S. Hewitt, '99 ; custodian, E. B. Lehman, 1900. 



490 THE WELLESLEY MAGAZINE. 

May 15. — The junior members of Society Phi Sigma give a " Shirt 
Waist" dunce in the barn. 

May 16. — 11.00 a. m., preaching by Professor J. K. Davis, of Boston 
University; 7.30 p. m., Talk by Miss Anna M. Cummings, of Wellington, 
South Africa, on her work in the Huguenot College. 

May 17. — Concert by Miss Mary A. Stowell, of the Wellesley College 
department of Music, assisted by Boston musicians. On the same evening 
the College Glee and Mandolin Clubs give a concert at Steinert Hall, under 
the auspices of the Boston Wellesley Club, and for the benefit of the Shafer 
Memorial Fund. 

May 20. — President Conklin, of the Springfield School for Christian 
Workers, addresses the weekly prayer meeting. 

May 21.— 3.00 p. m., Prof. Junius Hill and Mr. Wulf Fries give a 
recital in the chapel. 

May 22. — Miss Mary Caswell explains the workings of the College 
Teachers' Registry to students intending to teach. 

May 23. — Dr. G. K. Morris, of Boston, preaches in the chapel. 

May 24. — 3.00 p. m., Basket-ball game between '99 and 1900, resulting 
in the success of the latter class ; 4.00, the Faculty give a reception to the 
seniors and outside friends in the Farnsworth Art Building. 

May 29. — 9.00 a. m., Mrs. Charles G. Ames, recently appointed factory 
inspector for Boston, spoke on her work to the classes in History and Political 
Economy ; 7.30, Society Tau Zeta Epsilon gave a dance in the barn. 

May 30. — Dr. G. C. Lorimer, of the Tremont Temple, Boston, preaches 
in the chapel. 

May 31. — Society Phi Sigma at home in Society Hall. 

June 6. — Dr. Alexander McKenzie preaches in the chapel at 3.00 p. m. 

June 7. — Concert by the students of the School of Music. 

June 8. — Examinations begin. 

On Saturday, June 12, the Shakespeare Society, under a clear sky, 
presented "Love's Labor's Lost." The site for the play was very happily 
laid in a little hollow in the woods between the rhododendron bed and Long- 
fellow, where the highly appreciated sunlight now vaguely, now brightly 
flickering through the trees, lent a charm to the exquisite effect of color and 



THE WELLE SLEY MAGAZINE. 



491 



movement below. Miss Painter gracefully welcomed the audience, which 
was seated upon the ground on the sloping bank in front of the grassy stage, 
and the play followed, most successfully given by the following caste : — 



Ferdinand, King of Navarre 

Biron ....... 

Longaville } lords attendinfi , the King 
Dumain $ ° c 

Boyet, lord attending the Princess of France 
Mercade ...... 

Don Adriano de Armado, a Spaniard 
Sir Nathaniel, a curate . 
Holofernes, a schoolmaster 
Costard, a clown 
Dull, a constable 

Moth 

Princess of France . 

Rosaline ~) 

Maria > ladies attending the Princess 

Katharine ) 

Jaquetta, a country wench 



Helen Capron. 

Edna Patterson. 

J Corinne Wagner. 

I Julia Hill. 

Elizabeth Cheney. 

Grace Frazee. 

Geneva Crumb. 

Louise Loomis. 

Joanna Oliver. 

Mary Gilson. 

Mary Spink. 

Florence Bennett. 

Flora Skinner. 

Mary Malone. 

Maud Almy. 

Bessie Sullivan. 

Louise Orton. 



Scene, Navarre. 

The greatest charm of the presentation lay in the grouping and the 
color eft'ect, while the minuet, enthusiastically encored, will not quickly be 
forgotten by its spectators. 



TREE DAY. 

To give an adequate account of Tree Day this year seems an almost 
hopeless task. That it was one of the most effective, as well as the most 
affecting, sights which Wellesley has witnessed for many years is a general 
observation with which we would fain close our usual half-column account. 
Our spirits have been so depressed by our two sights of lugubrious nature, — 
a Niobe weeping over her freshman children, who would not he comforted 
because their Tree Day was not, — that to detail the memory seems like 
opening an old wound. The oppressive and prophetic gloom had been dom- 



492 THE WELLE SLEY MAGAZINE. 

insult in the atmosphere for some time before the 4th ; and to be or not to 
be — Tree Day, was the only question on every lip, when the day dawned in 
its usual sulks. So threatening was it until nine o'clock, that the Dean 
formally announced that recitations would proceed as usual ; but before the 
first period had elapsed the temper of the weather had changed, recitations 
were out, and Tree Day was in. At two o'clock the audience assembled in 
front of the Main Building entrance for the address of welcome by the 
senior president had begun to grow suspicious of the gathering clouds. The 
juniors, a brilliant crowd of Japanese, led by their mikado and his court, 
under a gorgeous red canopy, lay aside all formality of approach, and in spite 
of scant and hampering petticoats, raced down the Art Building hill across 
the campus, and gathered dismayed under a darkening sky. The undaunted 
freshmen, with song-dance and jangling bells, whooped around the corner of 
the library, bringing in the Mardi-Gras in all its fullness of glory and 
scarcity of clothing. The Queen and her ladies, conspicuous among their 
followers for their skirt lengths ; fools, strangely at ease in their clinging 
garb ; masked entities, Pierrots, fair Amazons, strange botanical specimens, 
and tiptoeing together for company in spite of extended breadths of crino- 
line, terpsichorean charmers of unfamiliar and unhallowed aspect, — all burst 
upon the scene with a suddenness as confounding as the low rumbles of 
thunder in the west. 

The sophomores, appearing from some hidden depths, added to the 
beauty (?), certainly to the numbers, of the throng with their graphic and 
somewhat too realistic representations of academic departments — Science, Lan- 
guage, History, and Literature. As they fell into their places in the wide 
circle surrounding the platform, the low and solemn organ tones pealed 
forth, accompanied by the funeral-like sight of one hundred and forty-two 
seniors moving impressively to their last Tree Day. Two by two they 
marched, their white gowns submerged in folds as black as the sky above 
them. After the address of welcome, by Miss Dewson, the guests of the oc- 
casion were, as quickly as ceremony would allow, hurried down to the lake- 
side of the campus, at the foot of the east steps, followed even less cere- 
moniously by the classes in their turn, who attempted to attract the attention 
of the sky gazers earthward, by wild bursts of class and college yells. A 
small court had been marked out on the campus, around which the audience 



THE WELLE SEE Y MAGAZINE. 493 

doubtfully seated itself with many misgiving glances at sky and Sunday 
clothes. The senior ceremony, after some delay occasioned by over-careful 
costuming, was then begun, — a shepherdesses' dance of the greatest artistic 
beauty and skill. Twenty seniors in five sets of different colors, pink, blue, 
lavender, yellow, and green, each carrying a huge gilded crook, moved 
through the mazes of intricate steps with the ease of long practice and natu- 
ral grace. 

But before they had completed more than two or three figures, the 
splash of drops could be heard on the Japanese umbrellas. Protesting cries 
of ' ' Postpone ! " " Go on ! " were raised ; a few on the outskirts of the crowd 
moved toward the building. The dancers consulted, then proceeded until a 
great torrent of rain sent them scampering up the hill. In a moment the 
wildest confusion ensued. The seniors, dropping their stately bearing, made 
a great dive for the barn, followed by most of the classes and the few guests 
who kept their heads. Wildly butting into trees, falling over each other, 
the heterogeneous mass of nondescripts fled to the four winds of heaven. 
The majority landed in the barn, dripping, hot, hopeless ; and as quickly as 
word could be sent those who had found shelter in the Main Building, fol- 
lowed. But in vain was such a gathering. A feeble burst of song from a 
few bedraggled members of the Glee Club, was all the entertainment which 
could be raised. The seniors could not, the freshmen would not, use the 
barn stage for their dance, and after a happy hour and a half of genial dis- 
cussion, Tree Day was declared at an end for the time. 

Its second attempt the following week was quite too mournful to be im- 
mortalized in these pages. A few undaunted freshmen, in mackintoshes and 
umbrellas, sung to their tearful leader under her dripping bower. A few 
words of wisdom, too hard worked for to be omitted, fell from the lips of the 
upper classes. Most of the student body nursed colds in their own rooms. 

So Tree Day came, and stayed, and went, without being at all. Never 
were signs of promise so alluring ; never had genius burnt so bright, nor 
freshmen looked so charming. 

But that is always the way. 

In accordance with the time-honored custom, the fete of the junior fo- 
rensics was held the evening of Tree Day. As might have been expected 



494 THE WELLESLEY MAGAZINE. 

at such a season, the weather was all that might have been hoped for, — in the 
way of appropriate gloom, blackness, and dampness. In their own original 
way '98 chose a new site for the festival, pitching it and their forensics in 
the center of the lake. In their customary white draperies they manned the 
stout ships moored to the shore, and with as much cheer as was possible in 
so humid an environment, the}'' orated and chanted over the incense-breath- 
ing flames mounting skyward from their raft load of precious" manuscript. 
Miss Goodwin as orator, Miss Damon as priestess, survived the. immanent 
danger of a watery death, — due to over-emotion in the Evangeline, — and won 
the everlasting respect of all who heard them. Among these were several 
unlawful spectators; i. e., Louise Loomis, '97 ; Bertha Straight, '97 ; Flora 
Skinner, '99, and Sophie Hart, Professor of English. All were dul}" ac- 
cused, and the Professor of English, after an attempt at self-defense in a trial 
given her by '98, was found guilty, and sentenced by the judge, Miss Edna 
Patterson. 

FLOAT. 

Owing to the rejection of the propositions of the Athletic Association 
that the outside guests at Float should be limited to those who could afford 
to enter on twenty-five cent tickets, the standard at Float was as low as 
usual, the crowd as happy, the affair as successful, — an odd fact. 

About six o'clock, after the collations at the different houses, the lake 
side and boathouse were packed with eager onlookers, the lake covered with 
small boats full of merrymakers. Each class gathered around its own staff' 
and banner upon the shore, and cheered at their own appropriate times. A 
greater interest than usual was added to the day, in that there was a certain 
specified order of events recorded in the very tasteful programmes : 1. Pa- 
rade of crews ; 2. Competition for best pairs ; 3. Competition for best 
crew of each pair ; 4. Competition of winning crews for championship: 5. 
Competition of coxswains in getting into boathouse ; 6. College crew with 
winning coxswain; 7. Forming of star singing; 8. Parade of crews in 
colored lights. Ninety-seven crew was declared the finest class crew on the 
lake, and its coxswain — the coxswain of the college crew — the finest cox- 
swain. 



THE WELLE SLEY MAGAZINE. 495 



COMMENCEMENT WEEK. 

CLASS SUPPER. 

The Class of '97 held its class supper at the Maugus Club House, 
Wellesley Hills, Thursday evening, June 17. They assembled at the foot 
of Norumbega Hill, and marched from there in a squadron of eight abreast 
to the electric cars, which waited for them at the West Lodge. Miss 
Dewson, as toastmistress, called for responses to the following toasts : — 

" The Deeds we Shaw " . . . Clara R. Purdy. 

" That he is gentil that doth gentil dedis." 
" The Basket-ball Field " . . . Elfie Graff. 

" Anon they cast off their veils and fell to playing at ball." 
" Our Reputation " .... Celena M. Whitney. 

" Of manners gentle, of affections mild, 
In wit a man; simplicity, a child." 

" Daffodils and their Symbolism" . Lucy Jane Freeman. 

" They flash upon that inward eye 
Which is the bliss of solitude." 

" Ninety-seven's Opinions . . . Grace L. Edgett. 

" For culture, it is requisite that men be acquainted with all points of view." 

" People We've Lived With " . . Florence Foley. 

" All sorts and conditions of women." 
" Great Expectations " . . . Judith A. Blackburn. 

" The world is a wheel, and it will all come around right." 
The history of '97's senior year was given before the supper, by Julia 
N. Colles and Emily Hoopes. 

GARDEN PARTY. 

In the afternoon of Friday, June 18, the Class of '97 met its friends on 
Norumbega Hill. The president and vice president formally received for 
the Class, while on the verandas of all the cottages small parties were enter- 
tained. Tables of refreshments were scattered at conveniently short dis- 
tances among the trees, while the Germania Military Band, hidden in the 
woods near by, added greatly to the novel charm of the occasion, also height- 
ened, more or less, by an unwonted number of men. The afternoon passed 
delightfully. 



496 



THE WELLE SLEY MAGAZINE. 



SENIOR PLAT. 

On the evening of Friday, June 18, the senior dramatics were given in 
the barn. The caste which presented " She Stoops to Conquer," was as fol- 
lows : — 

Sir Charles Marlowe .... Mary E. Sirnonds. 



Young Marlowe 
Hardcastle . 
Tony Lumpkin 



Hastings 
Stingo ' . 
Diggory 
Miss Hardcastle 
Miss Neville 
Mrs. Hardcastle 
Maid . 
First servant 
Second servant 

To speak in detail 
impossible. The parts 



Emily P. Baxter. 

Alice L. Wright. 

Geneva Crumb. 

Grace L. Edgett. 

Helen L. Atkins. 

Hetty M. Bo we. 

Margaret E. Starr. 

Gertrude M. Hall. 

Julia N. Colles. 

Emma A. Morrill. 

Blanche Currier. 

Judith A. Blackburn. 

of the talent manifested on this occasion would be 
were all taken with an ability which was remarkable, 
in consideration of the fact that so little attention is paid to dramatics at Welles- 
ley, and so short a time could be allowed for the preparation of this particu- 
lar play, which is undoubtedly a difficult one to present. Miss Starr made 
a most charming Miss Hardcastle, acting with an ease and naivety which 
quite won the hearts of her audience ; while Miss Baxter as Young Marlowe 
brought down the house with her representation of masculine timidity and 
boldness, neither of which extreme of character one could have imagined 
natural to her. The audience was extremely enthusiastic, notwithstanding 
the fact that in the rear of the house, owing to the flatness of the floor, it was 
hardly in a position to appreciate all that was said and done. 

CLASS DAY. 

The Class-day exercises were held on the afternoon of Saturday, June 
19, on the bank of Longfellow. The historians were Florence Foley, Caro- 
line M. Davis, Eva M. Guy, and Emily P. Johnson, whose clever plan of 



THE WELLE8LEY MAGAZINE. 497 

the presentation of '97's college career was very skillfully given in a num- 
ber of acts, different members of the class taking part. The presentation 
was called "Scenes from the History of a Famous Life." The first scene 
was "The Portent," in which, by means of a mighty telescope and various 
astrological instruments, '97 was seen looming in the distance. In the second 
scene Edith Ladd, as '97, appeared to learn the " Mystery of Life," and at- 
tended by Intelligence (Mary North) and Mirth (Louise Stockwell), tried 
to unwind the web of red tape which extended from various departments to 
the central guiding hand of Alma Mater (Edith Howland). In the third 
scene she " completed her period of probation," and in the fourth " turns to 
revelry," when the gypsy dance of '97 freshman Tree Day was repeated with 
great success. In the fifth scene '97 had its junior Prom. ; and in the sixth, 
completed its senior Tree-day dance, — this time with undampened ardor. 
The prophecy was given by Miss Miriam Hathaway. 

THE PRESIDENT'S RECEPTION. 

On the evening of Saturday, June 19, the President received the senior 
class and its friends in the Stone Hall parlor. She was assisted by the Dean 
and Miss Pendleton. Refreshments, served hospitably in the dining room, 
added to the pleasure of the occasion. 

BACCALAUREATE SUNDAY. 

The morning of June 20 dawned inauspiciousl}*, and though it did not 
rain severely, proved to be a gloomy day. The sermon was given by the 
Rev. A. J. F. Behrends, D.D., of Brooklyn, N. Y. His text was from 
2 Tim. ii. 19. "Howbeit the firm foundation of God standeth." 

This foundation, he said, was the Church, which had two securities, in- 
ward and outward. The frrst was Christ himself, the shepherd of the flock 
who led, not drove his sheep; the second was the cultivation of personal 
purity. The twofold lesson which he brought to the graduating class was, 
first, that the earth is the Lord's, and the fullness thereof, and that each of 
them had her place in it, — a task which it was her duty to find and do ; 
secondly, that the path of purity is the path of peace. The organ prelude 
was by Professor Hill, while the vocal selections were given by the Beethoven 
and Glee Clubs. 



498 THE WELLE 'SLEY MAGAZINE. 

Vespers in the evening were largely attended and were particularly suc- 
cessful, owing to the enthusiasm and skill of the college chorus and the 
happy selections of Professor Hill. 

GLEE AND MANDOLIN CLUBS CONCERT. 

On Monday afternoon, June 21, the Glee and Mandolin Clubs gave 
their annual concert to the seniors on the banks of Longfellow. The audi- 
ence, a very full one, was seated comfortably upon cushions, pillows, and rugs 
on the opposite slope. The programme, according to custom, had been 
previously made out by the seniors, so that each selection was heartily re- 
ceived, especially "Ben Bolt" by Miss Hoyt, a song of which the College has- 
never tired. The following was the programme : — 

1. (a) The College Beautiful. 

Words by Katharine Lee Bates, '80. 

(b) Courtship. 

(c) My College Girl. 

Words by Alice W. Kellogg, '93. 

2. El Capitan. 

Sousa. 

3. (a) At Wellesley. 

Words by Mary Hefferan, '96. 
Solo by Miss Scott. 

(b) Verlassen. 

(c) Lake of Grey. 

Words by Louise Manning Hodgkins. 

4. La Carmela Waltz. 

Tocaben. 

5. (a) Tupelo. 

(b) Proposal. 

(c) 'Neath the Oaks. 

6. Cavalleria Rusticana (Intermezzo). 

Arranged by Walter Fay Lewis. 



THE WELLESLEY MAGAZINE. 499 

7. (a) Ben Bolt. 

Solo by Miss Hoyt. 
(6) A Model College Girl. 

Words by Katharine Lee Bates, '80. 

(c) At Parting. 

Words by Josephine Simrall, '93. 

(d) To Alma Mater. 

Words by Anne L. Barrett, '86. 

8. (a) Zenda Waltzes. 

Witmark. 
(b) Domino March. 
Tocaben. 

COMMENCEMENT CONCERT. 

On Monday evening, June 21, the following programme was given by 
the Boston Instrumental Club, Mr. W. W. Swornsbourne, conductor : — 

Overture, " Le Pre aux Clercs " Herold. 

Trio, " Nocturne," Op. 19 Doppler. 

For Violin, Flute, and Violoncello. 
Ballet Music, "La Reine de Saba" Gounod. 

(a) Andante. 

(b) Allegretto. 

(c) Andante moderate 

(d) Tempo di Valse. 

Morceaux, (a) " La Veillee del'Ange Gardien " . . Pierne". 

(b) " Fly Minuet " from " Der Bajazzo " . . Czibulka. 

STRING ORCHESTRA. 

Selections from " I Pagliacci" Leoncavallo. 

Canzonetta, "Felice" Langey. 

Concert Duet, Fantasie on airs from " Faust " . . . Gounod Cavallini. 

For Flute and Clarinet. 

MR. VAN SANTVOORD AND MR. STAATS. 

Morceaux, («) "Pizzicato" Gillet. 

(I>) Marcietto, " A Petit Pas " .... Sudessi. 

Valse, " Amorettentiinze" Gungl. 

Selections from " Tannliiiuser" Wagner. 



500 THE WELLE SEE Y MAGAZINE. 



COMMENCEMENT DAY. 

On Tuesday, June 22, at two o'clock, the graduating exercises of the 
Class of '97 took place in the chapel. The confusion and unpleasantness of 
former years, arising from too large an audience, had been entirely done 
away with by reserving the seats and issuing no more entrance tickets than 
the chapel would hold. 

At two o'clock the academic procession, headed by Dr. Mackenzie and 
Mrs. Durant, followed by Mrs. Irvine and the speaker of the day, Prof. 
Calvin Thomas, the trustees, and members of the Faculty, marched to the 
platform. The alumnte were seated on the left-hand side of the chapel, 
while the graduating class, led by Miss Edna Patterson and Miss Ruth Good- 
win, president and vice president of the senior class, took their accustomed 
seats in the central block. The exercises opened by the organ prelude, by 
Professor Hill : "Largo," by Handel ; Cantilene Nuptiale, by Dubois" and 
"Andante con moto," by Calkin. Then came the reading of the Scripture 
in Latin, by the President, with responses from the class. Prayer was fol- 
lowed by Mendelssohn's motette, " Praise ye the Lord," by the College 
chorus. 

The address given by Prof. Calvin Thomas, of Columbia College, was 
on "Our Need of Poetry." He said it was sad to realize that poetry, 
which formed so precious a part of our inheritance, should be looked upon 
with such a lack of seriousness to-day. Poetry is the avocation, not the 
vocation, of poets to-day ; and though they may still be created, poetry is 
now not born but made. The two objections made against poetry, Professor 
Thomas proved invalid, — first that it was frivolous, and second that it was 
unscientific. The great function of poetry, he said, was to satisfy our needs. 
We need it for amusement, we need it for instruction, we need it for conso- 
lation, and, most of all, for joy. 

Professor Thomas concluded with a short address to the graduating 
class. You are about to enter, he said, on a long course in the art of for- 
getting. Your stores of learning will soon lie but inarticulate ghosts in the 
land of memory. Give up your Latin and Greek, if you choose, but do not 
give up the poets. In them you will alwa3 r s find the ministers of the joy of 
elevated thoughts. 



THE WELLESLEY MAGAZINE. 501 

A selection from Bitter, "A Wind came up out of the Sea," was ihen 
followed by the conferring of degrees. One hundred and forty-two B.A. 
degrees, four M.A. degrees, were given. There were also three graduates 
from the School of Music. 

The Glee Club then sang " Sweet and Low," followed by the benedic- 
tion and the organ postlude, Dr. Wareing's Festival March, by Professor 
Hill. 

Commencement Dinner was served immediately afterward to the Presi- 
dent's party, including Mrs. Durant, Miss Howard, first President of Welles- 
ley, and Mrs. Alice Freeman Palmer, second President of Wellesley, the 
trustees, alumnte, and the graduating class. 

After the dinner Mrs. Irvine rose and asked for a few words from Dr. 
Mackenzie, after which Professor Thomas was called upon to answer the 
charge of coming to Wellesley on a missionary journey to the literature de- 
partment. He answ r ered by saying that the incidental evil of the address 
was not his object in coming, but to see for himself the results of the experi- 
ment of higher education. 

Mrs. Palmer recalled a few memories of her graduating days at Michi- 
gan, and her first ones at Wellesley. Mrs. Cutler, of the Class of '84, spoke 
of her work at Northfield, and of the pleasant relationship between North- 
field and Wellesley. Miss Coman, for the Faculty, spoke of the privilege 
she had just enjoyed of taking advantage of Professor Horsford's plan for the 
Sabbatical year abroad, and dwelt upon the wonderful loyalty of Wellesley 
alumnse. Mrs. Irvine then announced '97's gift to the College, which was 
received with long-continued applause. 

The Glee Club, stationed in the bay window behind the President's 
table, had sung several times through the speech-making, and now concluded 
the ceremony by the cheer. 

The Reception in the evening was attended with the usual success. 



502 THE WELLE SEE Y MAGAZINE. 



SOCIETY NOTES. 

A regular meeting of the Shakespeare Society was held in Shakespeare 
Hall on Saturday, May 29, 1897. The following programme was then 
presented : — 

I. Shakespeare News ..... Grace F razee. 
II. Dramatic Representation. Love's Labor's 
Lost, Act V., Scene 2. 

III. Comparison of the Character of Antony in 

Julius Caesar and in Antony and Cleopatra, Mary Shoemaker. 

IV. Cleopatra in Literature .... Louise T. Orton. 
V. Dramatic Representation. Love's Labor's 

Lost, Act L, Scene 1. 

On Friday, May 28, the Classical Society held its last programme 
meeting. It was a review of the past year's work on Classic Comedy. 
Symposium. 

News ....... Mary E. Pierce. 

Greek War Jessie G. Hall. 

Discussion. 

The Greek Comedy, early and late . . . Jane Finn. 

The Latin Comedy, early and late . . Mary Galbfaith. 

Readings. 

From Aristophanes: early comedy, "The 

Clouds;" late comedy, " Plutus " . . Grace Linscott. 
From Latin Comedy: early, Plautus, " Men- 
achius;" late, Terence, "The Mother-in- 
law" 

On June 7 the Society received the consent of the council to change its 
name to Society Alpha Kappa Chi. 

On June 12 the Society gave a dance in the barn to its friends. 

On June 14 the Society had an initiation meeting. Emma Watt, '98, 
and Louise M. Sturtevant, '99, were received into the Society. 



THE WELLE8LEY MAGAZINE. 503 

On Monday, the 21st, the Society gave a tea to the alumnse who were 
back. Florence Davis, '94, Grace Albee, '94, Lillian Quinby, '94, and 
Margaret Simmons, '95, were present. 

A meeting of Society Zeta Alpha was held June 12. The following 
officers were installed : Frances Hoyt, President ; Virginia Schoonover, 
Vice President ; Freda Moore, Recording Secretary ; Alice Childs, Corres- 
ponding Secretary ; Eliza Craig, Treasurer ; Florence Breed and Edith 
Tewksbury, Marshals. The following members were initiated into the 
Society : Margaret Arnold, '98, Helen Cady, '99, Luna Converse. Miss 
Thomas, '97, was present at the meeting. 



ALUMNAE NOTES. 

A most successful drill was recently given by the athletic classes of the 
Y. W. C. A. of Minneapolis, Minn., under the direction of Abbie S. May- 
hew, formerly of '85. 

Katharine Payne Jones, '85, will lecture the first semester of next year 
on History of Florentine Painting in the XIV. and XV. Centuries. 

Susan Wade Peabody, '86, has been studying Economics during the 
winter and spring at the University of Chicago. 

The engagement of Edith James, '89, of Seattle, is announced. 

Isabelle Stone, '89, is to take the degree of Doctor of Physics at the 
University of Chicago in July. 

Maryette Goodwin Mackey, '89, has been spending the winter at Battle 
Creek and Mt. Clemens, Mich. 

Eleanor Gamble, '89, who has had the psychology fellowship at Cornell 
during the past year, is the proud possessor of an instrument for measuring 
smells, recently imported for her special use. It is the only one of its kind 
in America. 

Mrs. Caroline Williamson Montgomery, '89, and Lillian V. Pike, '92, 
have been made directors of the Chicago Branch of the Association of 
Collegiate Alumnre. 



504 THE WELLE SLEY MAGAZINE. 

Ethel Glover, '90, who has been studying at the University of Chicago 
during the past three years, will write her thesis in Washington, continu- 
ing her reading at the Congressional Library. 

At a meeting of the New York Library Association, held May 14 and 
15 at Rochester, Miss Myrtilla Avery, '91, of the New York State Library, 
gave a paper on "Study Clubs and Reading Circles in their Relation to 
Public Libraries." 

Katherine Florence Gleason, '91, has just received the degree of Master 
of Arts, from the University of California, for advanced work in English. 
Her thesis was entitled, "Browning's Dramatic Art." Miss Gleason's 
present address is 2125 Blake Street, Berkeley, Cal. 

Maria Baldwin, '91, has been spending a few days at the College. 

The address of Mrs. Evarts Ewing Munn, formerly '91, is changed 
from Benicia Arsenal, Cal., to Fort Logan, Colo, (near Denver). 

Pauletta Guffey, '92, is to be principal next year of a private school in 
Alleghany, Pa. 

Emma Lenore MacAlarney, '92, is instructor in English Literature and 
English Composition in the High School at Harrisburg, Pa. 

Martha McCaulley, '92, is to be assistant in the English department next 
year. 

Ermina Ferris, '92, received this spring the degree of Master of Arts in 
English at Stanford University, Cal. The subject of her thesis was, "A 
Comparative Study of Some Grail Romances." Caroline Frear, '93, re- 
ceived the same degree in Education at that university. Her thesis was 
entitled, "Punishment : An Historical, Sociological and Pedagogical Study." 

Emily Foley, '93, has been teaching Rhetoric, English Literature, and 
History this winter in Miss Ely's school, Clifton, Ohio. 

Grace Blodgett, '93, is acting principal of the High School in Temple- 
ton, Mass. She teaches Mathematics and the Sciences. 

Virginia Corbin, '94, graduates this month from the New York State 
Normal College. Her permanent address has been changed from East 
McDonough to Oxford, N. Y. 



THE WELLE8LEY MAGAZINE. 505 

Gertrude Angell and Helen Drake, both of '94, will spend the summer 
together abroad. 

Mary Miller, formerly '96, spent the month of May in Chicago with 
Julia Lyman, '96, and May Pitkin, '95. 

Elva Coulter, '94, has been teaching the past year in the High School 
at Southington, Conn. 

Harriet Blake, '94, and Mabel Wellman, '95, spent Sunday, June 13, 
at the College. 

Susie E. Goddard, '95, is teaching History and Greek in the High 
School at Wakefield, Mass. 

May Kellogg, '96, is teaching in the Fern Street Grammar School of 
Pittsfield, Mass. 

Lillian S. Swett, '96, has obtained the position of proof reader for the 
Republican Press Association of Concord, N. H. 

Among the alumnae who were back for Tree Day, or Float, were Helen 
Foss, Marion Canfield, and Caroline Randolph, '94, May Cannon, '95, 
Belinda Bogardus, Agnes Caldwell, Constance Emerson, Louise McNair, 
Cornelia Park, Joanna Parker, Carlotta Swett, all of '96. 

The following alumnae took the degree of M.A. this year: Ellen A. 
Vinton, '84, Susan W. Child, '90, Martha G. McCaulley, '92, Josephine 
Thorpe, '95. 

The annual meeting of the College Settlement Association was held at 
95 Rivington Street, New York, May 8. The result of the election was as 
follows: President, Mrs. Caroline Williamson Montgomery, W., '89; Vice 
President, Miss Vida Dutton Scudder, S., '84; Secretary, Miss Susan G. 
Walker, B. M., '93; Treasurer, Miss Cornelia Warren, non-col.; fifth 
member, Mrs. Jean Fine Spahr, S., '84. 

NEWS FROM DENISON HOUSE. 

Miss Scudder is spending the closing weeks of the college term at 
Denison House. 

The Wellesley Glee and Banjo Clubs, as well as several groups of 
students, have entertained on Thursday evenings at the Settlement this year. 



506 THE WELLESLEY MAGAZINE. 

The regular engagement for one Thursday evening in the month seems to be 
a, most satisfactory way of bringing together the College girls and Settlement 
workers and neighbors. 

The closing meetings of the clubs and classes will take place early in 
June. Miss Lane, of '89, Miss Edith Sawyer, Sp., Miss Stanwood, of '94, 
Miss Sherwin, of '90, have formed the Wellesley constituency of our corps 
of teachers this year. Miss Lane has continued her class in English during 
its second year, and the work done has been highly successful. As always, 
the permanency in Settlement work contributes largely to its value. Miss 
Sherwin will resume the work with her class of Russian girls next fall. 

The final meeting and entertainment for two of the young girls' clubs 
was held Wednesday evening. A Butterfly Party, under the direction of 
Mrs. J. T. Prince, '91-93, was the principal feature of the evening. 

The Kindergarten Club, consisting of fifteen children meeting for kin- 
dergarten games Saturday afternoons, has recently enjoyed two outings at 
Franklin Park. Miss Keene, '95, and Miss Rousmanier, have been sharing 
the duties and responsibilities of leadership of this Club. 

Miss Sherwin and her class of Russian girls enjoyed a Sunday afternoon 
at Freeman Cottage a few weeks ago. 

Miss Fiske, '92, has been giving one afternoon a w T eek to Settlement 
work for several months past. 

At the annual meeting of the Chicago Wellesley Club, April 24, the 
following officers were elected : president, Miss Ada Belfield, '95 ; vice 
president, Mrs. Caroline Williamson Montgomery, '89 ; secretary, Miss 
Christine Caryl, '94 ; treasurer, Miss Theresa Newburger ; executive com- 
mittee, Mrs. Caroline Williamson Montgomery, chairman, Miss Ada Bel- 
field, ex officio, Miss Julia Lyman, Miss Elizabeth Morse, Mrs. C. A. Weare. 
The meeting was followed by an informal reception, at which the Wellesley 
girls now attendino; the University acted as hostesses. Among those enter- 
taining were Miss Talbot, Miss Susan Peabody, '86, Miss Ethel Glover, '90, 
Miss Dora Wells, '84, Miss Antoinette Cary, and Miss May Cook, '89. 

The Worcester Wellesley Club gave a reception to the college women 
of their city on Friday afternoon, the seventh of May. About one hundred 
and fifty were present. Mrs. Alice Freeman Palmer was the guest of honor, 



THE WELLESLEY MAGAZINE. 507 

and gave a very delightful talk on the subject of "Foreign Universities." 
The colleges represented were Mt. Holyoke, Smith, Vassar, Bryn Mawr, 
Radcliffe, Swarthmore, Granville, and Wellesley, and Colby, Cornell, Mich- 
igan, Pennsylvania, and Boston Universities. An impromptu Glee Club, 
under the direction of Mrs. May Sleeper Ruggles, special, rendered several 
appropriate college songs and cheers. Among the Wellesley guests were 
Miss Flora Hall, '91, and Miss Marion Bradbury, '93. 

At the annual meeting of Western Wellesley Association held in Sep- 
tember, 1896, it was voted that a committee be appointed by the chair to 
confer with a committee from the Chicago Wellesley Club, to consider the 
advisability of uniting the two organizations. The chief reason for doing 
this was that the members of the Western Wellesley Association then 
present felt the Association had outlived its usefulness. Five hundred 
notices had been sent out and only fifty responses were received. The two 
committees met, and after much discussion it was decided to disband the 
Western Wellesley Association ; and the Chicago Wellesley Club added the 
following article to their constitution: "Any member of the Western 
Wellesley Association who desires to become a regular member of the Club 
may do so by paying the annual fee. Any member of the Western Welles- 
ley Association who desires to become an associate member of the Club may 
do so by informing the secretary to that effect. Her name will then be 
placed upon the list of associate members, and she will receive an invitation 
to the annual banquet." It is hoped by the officers of the Western Welles- 
ley Association that all who were interested in the Association will feel that 
the disbandment was brought about by its own action, and not by that of 
the Chicago Wellesley Club. 

MARRIAGES. 

Parsons-Brush. — In New Haven, Conn., May 18, 1897, Miss Bertha 
De Forest Brush, formerly '93, to Rev. Edward Lainbe Parsons. 

Adams-Parkes. — In Rochester, N. Y., May 14, 1897, Miss Evelyn 
Emma Parkes, '92, to Rev. Floyd Holder) Adams. At home, after June 25, 
at 25 Jackson Street, Palmyra, N. Y. 



508 THE WELLE '8 LEY MAGAZINE. 

Norton-Russell. — In Wellesley, Mass., June 16, 1897, Miss Mary 
R. Russell, '94, to Mr. Fred Norton, graduate of Amherst College and of 
Boston University Law School. 

Brann-Nutter. — In Bangor, Me., June 9, 1897, Miss Grace Nutter, 
'96, to Mr. Ralph Mahlon Brann. At home, after November 1, at 1153 
Race Street, Denver, Col. 

Scott-Downing. — In Aurora, 111., April 21, 1897, Miss Alice May 
Downing, formerly '96, to Mr. Robert Bruce Scott. At home, after June 
1, at 148 Pennsylvania Avenue, Aurora, III. 

Snow-Northrop. — In Roxbury, Mass., May 19, 1897, Miss Alice 
Northrop, special, '84-85, to Charles Henry Snow, Dean of the Engineering 
School of New York University. 

Card well-Parker. — In Worcester, Mass., June 10, 1897, Miss Grace 
N. Parker, special, '86-87, to Dr. John C. Cardwell, of Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Bolton-Stanwood. — In Brookline, Mass., June 23, 1897, Miss Ethel 
Stanwood, '94, to Mr. Charles Knowles Bolton, Librarian of the Brookline 
Public Library. At home, after November 6, at 118 Davis Avenue, 
Brookline. 

BIRTHS. 

April 19, 1897, in Lawrenceville, N. J., a daughter, Carolyn Elizabeth, 
to Mrs. Harriet Farnsworth Gulick, '87. 

April 23, 1897, a daughter to Mrs. Anne Barrett Hughes, '86. 



DEATHS. 

In Newton, Mass., May 16, 1896, Miss Agnes Hallock, special, '78. 

In Ashland, Ivy., April 5, 1897, Mrs. Louise Sheldon Adams, '92. 

In Saint Joseph, Miss., May 27, 1897, Mr. Frank T. Rhoades, father 
of Edith Moss Rhoades, '96. 



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WELLESLEY, MASS. 

Pupils are prepared for regular or for special courses at 
Wellesley College. 

Price for Board and Tuition, $500 for the school year; 
Tuition for day pupils, $125. 

For further information address the Principals : 



Julia A. Eastman, 
Sarah P. Eastman. 



AND . . 



ar 



BICYCLES, 



C. W. PERRY, Sole Agent, 

IniELLESLEY. 

iPerrE's 2)rug Store. 



DREKA 

Fine Stationery and Engraving House 

1121 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. 

WEDDING INVITATIONS 
RECEPTION CARDS 
MONOGRAMS 
COATS OF ARMS 
ADDRESS DIES 



COLLEGE INVITATIONS 
STATIONERY 
PROGRAMMES 
BANQUET MENUS 
FRATERNITY ENGRAVING 



Heraldry and Genealogy a Specialty. 

Coats of Arms Painted for Framing. 



AD VERTISEMENTS. 



^M^oman's Medical College of the 
^ New York Infirmary for Women and Children. 



^»ESSION '96-97 opens October 1, 1S96. Four years, Graded Course. 
C Instruction by Lectures, Clinics, Recitations and practical work, under 
supervision in Laboratories, and Dispensary of College, and in New York 
Infirmary. Clinics and operations in most of the City' Hospitals and Dis- 
pensaries open to Women Students. For Catalogues, etc., address 



321 East Fifteenth Street, 
New York. 



EMILY BLACKWELL, M. D. 



N. C. WHITAKER & CO., 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Fine Tortoise Shell Goods. 

Salesroom, 7 TEMPLE PLACE. 

Factory, 363 Washington St., BOSTON. 

Special discount to Wellesley Students. 

JOSEPH E. DeWITT, 
Stationer and Picture Dealer. 

Special attention given to Framing' 
Pictures at reasonable prices. <$&& 

ST 

It is of easy access by the Electric Cars. 

No. 2 riain Street, Natick, Hass. 

H. W. DOWNS COMPANY 
Fine^nillinery. 

Trimmed and Untrimmed Hats. 
Bicycle and Walking Hats a Specialty. 

Our Dress-lining' Department is the 
largest in the city, j* & <£ <£ <£ <£ 
Special prices to Wellesley Students. 



H. W. DOWNS COMPANY, 



No. 143 TREMONT STREET, 
BOSTON. 



WALNUT HILL SCHOOL. 



fflellesley Preparatory, 



NATICK, MASS. 



For circular address the Principals, 

MISS CHARLOTTE H. CONANT, B.A. 
MISS FLORENCE BIGELOW, M.A. 

Established 1843. Incorporated 1S95. 

STUDENTS, ATTENTION! 

Largest Stock and Lowest 
Prices on 



sr 



Mathematical Instruments, 

Drawing Materials and Picture Frames 



OF ALL KINDS AT 



FROST & ADAMS CO., 

Importers and Wholesale Dealers, 
37 CORNHILL, BOSTON. 



'Special Rates to Colleges." 

New Illustrated Catalogue Fhee. 



AD VER TISEMENTS. 



IN THE EQUIPMENT OF A STUDENT'S ROOM, 

It is generally conceded that a stringed instrument 
is almost an absolute necessity. To secure the 
greatest enjoyment from the purchase get the best 
your money will afford. Expert judgment 
pronounces the "Bay State" instruments 
the finest in the world. An excellent instru- 
ment is the 

BAY STATE $10.00 BANJO. 

We have in stock cheaper banjos than this, 
"* but for a substantial, serviceable instrument 
at a low price, no other instrument manufac- 
tured can compare with it. Send for illus- 
trated catalogue. 

JOHN C. HAYNES & CO., 
453-463 Washington Street, Boston. 



JOHN W. SANBORN I CO., 

Opticians. 

LENSES GROUND 1P PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED 



FULL LINE of Hand Cameras and 
Material<>*<£*<^Negatives Developed. 
Prints Made and Moonted^<^<^^<^ 



WINSHIP 



Wellesley Graduates are always in demand. 
Register now. 



TEACHERS' 



William F. Jarvis, Manager. 

Send for registration blanks and circulars. 



AGENCY. 



3 SOMERSET STREET, BOSTON. 



ST ATI O N E R Yj j- j- j- & j- j> 

A Large Variety in the Latest Styles. 



Fancy Goods, Novelties, Picture Frames, 
Bicycles, etc., etc. 

FAIRBANKS & SON, 

16 main Street, Natick, Mass. 



PRI NTI NGjjL.tu^jJjLjL 

First-Class Work. Prompt Service. 



Class and Society Printing a Specialty. 

We Guarantee Satisfaction. 

"The Bulletin Press," 

18 Main Street, Natick, Mass. 



JVlQ CjrlOVeS, Hosiery, Underwear and Ribbons, Embroidery 
Silks, Stamped Linens, Denims, Art Muslins, and Cretonnes. J-J-J- 

J. B, Leamy, Natick, Mass. 



IO per cent discount to all 

Professors and Students of 
Wellesley College. 



Artists'. . . 
Materials 



Drafting Instruments. Art Studies and Books. 

Oil and Water Colors, Crayons, Materials 
For Tapestry, Painting, etc. 

wadswonn, Howiaqd & Co., - 82 and 84 Washington Si., Boston. 

Branch Store in the Grundmann Studios, Clarendon Street, near St. James Avenue. Principal Factories, Maiden, 

Mass., and South Paris, Maine. 



AD VERTISJEMENT8. 



Lights *s* jt <$• Easy^^^^Firm 
Also the most reasonable in price. 




OUR BAR-SPRING EYEGLASS. 



ACCURATE PRESCRIPTION WORK OUR SPECIALTY. 



PINKHHM & SMITH, 

Prescription Opticians, 



288 B0YL3T0N STREET, 



BOSTON, MASS. 



New York Medical College and Hospital for Women. 

New York City, 213 West 54th St. 

THE FIRST HOMEOPATHIC MEDICAL COLLEGE FOR 
WOMEN IN THE WORLD. 

Thirty-fourth Annual Course of Lectures began October 2, 1896. 

Curriculum includes a Four Years' Graded Course of Study, 
happily interspersing Didactic and Clinical Lectures, to- 
gether with Practical Anatomy, Chemical and Histo- 
logical Laboratory Work, so as to give the broadest 
cultivation with the least possible fatigue to the 
students. Everything promised in the An- 
nouncement rigidly adhered to. 

J. de la M. LOZ1ER, M.D., Sci.D., Dean, 

135 West 34th St., New York City. 
For information, address 

M. BELLE BROWN, M.D., Sec'y, 

135 West 34th Street, New York City. 

EUROPEAN PARTY. 

Evangeline Hathaway, '90, is organizing- a private party 
for the summer of '97. An experienced conductor will accom- 
pany the party. Address her at 1 1 Beacon Street, Boston. 

Ibujb Class 
©ics 

Embossing 
Crests 
Hums 
-Cart) anfc jpart\> jEnoravino 




Special EMscount to TCUllcsIc? StuSenta 
Removed to ISO Tremont St., Boston, Was*. 



DON'T 

Imperil your health by going 
without your luncheon when 
you can find such dainty, pal- 
atable, and nutritious food for 
moderate prices, at^^t^ji^,^ 

Cool's Ladies' ldqgH. 

AVON STREET. 



IN THE MIDST OF THE SHOP- 
PING DISTRICT. 



All orders for articles per- 
taining to dinners or desserts 
and for the service of parties 
will be carefully executed,^*?* 




"EXPRESSLY roil THE l"INI: TRADE 



AD VERTISEMENTIS. 



snesarl mil & Co. 

Deliver all packages st the 
College and in Wellesley free 
of charge £•£•<$•&£•£•£•£• 



HI UI(UU0 Stand the Light ! 
The more light the more good 
points you see. 

Perfect satisfaction in every purchase, 
and that backed up to the letter. Men- 
tion this advertisement. 

UnderWOOd, Leader in Footv 

3 Clark's Block, Natick. 



London Mixture 
Breakfast Tea. 

$1.00 per pound. 

S. S. PIERCE CO., 

Tremont Bldg\, cor. Tremont and Beacon 
Sts., Copley Square, and Central Wharf, 
Boston, and Coolidge's Corner, Brookline 

Pine Confections . . Large variety 

of Fancy Boxes for Presents. 




146 Tremont St. 
Boston- 
Delicious Ice Cream Soda. Mail orders receive 
prompt and careful attention. 



The Young Ladies' Attention is called to something 
very attractive in a 

French Flannel Shirt Waist, 

which has been made to order in the most Fashionable 
colors and very "Chic" style for 

MISS M. F. FISK, 

No. 44 Temple Place, Boston. 




The Young Ladies should make a special examination of these Waists, as they are 

proving wonderfully satisfactory. 



THE HORACE PARTRIDGE CO. 

:;:t."» Washington Street, Boston. 

College Athletic and Gymnasium Outfitters. 

TENNIS, GOLF, AND BASKET BALL GOODS. 

Crew Sweaters and Jerseys, which are also suitable for all athletic purposes, made to order in any 

style in the best manner. 
A Discount of 10 per cent is given Wellesley students on individual orders. Special net rates for crew or team orders. 



We sell 
High Grade 



PIHNOS 



Shaw 

Reimers 

Wegman 

Guild 



At price of LOW GRADE elsewhere. 



I Jacobs 

THIS COUPON 1S G00D F0R $25.00 

TOWARD PURCHASE OF ANY OF ABOVE INSTRUMENTS, IF CUT 
OUT AND PRESENTED AT OUR WAREROOMS BEFORE APRIL 1 , 1 897. 



FRANKLIN A. SHAW, 

Manager. 



B0YLST0N PIANO CO., 160 Boylston St. 



Perfect Comfort 



For women and positive style. That's what we studied 
for. That's what we have. Not a toe crowded . Noth- 
ing to pinch or hurt. 



TheH. H. "TuttleShoe 



»» 



is made on men's lasts. Has that graceful outside 
swing that gives the little toe breathing room. Double- 
soled calf for those who want heavy shoes. Lighter 
grades for others. $4 to $8 is the price. Discount to 
Students and Faculty. 

H. H. TUTTLE & CO., 

Washington St., cor. Winter Street. 



The Fisk Teachers' Agencies. 

4 Ashburton Place, Boston, Mass. 

70 Fifth Avenue, New York City, N. Y. 
1242 Twelfth Street, Washington, D. C. 
355 Wabash Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

25 King Street, West Toronto, Canada. 

420 Century Building, Minneapolis, Minn. 

107 Keith & Perry Building, Kansas City, Mo. 
728 Cooper Building, Denver, Col. 

525 Stimson Block, Los Angeles, Cal. 

CARBON PORTRAITS. 

Photographs in all colors by the Carbon Process. 

Enlarged or reduced copies of Paintings, Engrav- 
nigs, etc. These photographs are absolutely per- 
manent, and of the greatest artistic merit. 

THE SEPIA STUDIO, 

No. 145-A Tremont' Street, Boston, Mass. 
T. Irvin Chapman, 



Joel Goldthwait & Company, 

Oriental Carpets and Rugs. Axminsters, Wilton and 

Brussels Carpets. 

We are now ready to show the finest line we ever opened in 

Foreign and Domestic Carpets. 

All new in style, and adapted to the present furnishing 
Our own special patterns. Our open stock is full at prices lower than ever. 



Joel Goldthwait & Company, 



Near Cornhill. 



163 to 169 Washington Street, Boston, mass. 



In every department of our store we allow Wellesley Professors and 
Students a discount, generally 10 per cent. 

We deliver all goods free of express charges at Wellesley College and Dana Hall. 



During the year you will notice many attractive goods which your friends at home 
would be glad to see. We shall be glad to send samples at your request. 

Dress Goods, Hosiery, Neckwear, Millinery, 
Underwear and Art Embroideries 

are perhaps some of the departments most interesting to students, but the discount applies 
to every department. 

R. H. STEARNS & CO. 

Tremont Street and Temple Place, - - BOSTON, MASS. 



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GEO. A. PLUMMER & CO. 
Ladies' and Children's 

Specialty Garment House. 



Young Ladies' Coats, Suits, 
Wraps, Fur Capes, Rain-proof 
Garments, Silk Petticoats, 
and Tea Gowns. 



The Latest Paris and Berlin Novelties 

Always in Stock at 
Moderate Prices. . . 



531 and 533 Washington Street, Boston 

Next door to Boston Theatre. 



Frank Wood, Printer, Boston.